Get Published Weekly Roundup: March 12th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

It's both rained and snowed today, pretty much par for the course in early spring in Charlottesville. I have no doubt it will probably be sunny and eighty degrees tomorrow, with snow again on Saturday. Speaking of Saturday, an early Éirinn go Brách to all y'all. We hope you're all able to enjoy a stout or two in a quiet pub somewhere. Or get beer spilled on your shoes by overenthusiastic twentysomethings, which is much more likely, if that's your thing. This week we've got some agency news, a great submission possibility if you're into arid places, some MSWL highlights, and an organizational ethnographer (that's a thing? I didn't know that was a thing) at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Looking for an agent who specializes in nonfiction? Here are two new hires seeking clients like you

Leslie Meredith has joined Mary Evans, Inc. as an agent.

Seeking:

Nonfiction: Memoir; Science; Psychology; Health; Nature/Animals; Spirituality/New Age

Leslie is accepting queries via email at info@maryevansinc.com, or by post at 242 East Fifth Street, New York, NY 10003. More information on submission guidelines may be found here.

Allison Janice has joined Serendipity Literary Agency as an associate agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Romance; Mystery; Select Women’s Fiction 

Nonfiction: Cooking/Nutrition; Health and Wellness; Self-Help; Memoir; Humor; Psychology; History; Science

"In her new role as an agent at Serendipity, she aims to work with a range of nonfiction clients on the topics of cooking, nutrition, health and wellness, self-help, memoir, humor, psychology, history, and science, particularly in the areas of body-positivity, veganism, and environmentalism. She is also open to fiction in the area of romance and mystery, as well as the odd women’s fiction title. Push the boundaries of your genre and use your voice for good!"

Allison is accepting submissions via email at info@serendipitylit.com. For more information on the agency's submission guidelines, see here for fiction and here for non-fiction.

Submission Deadlines

More nonfiction and some non-nonfiction: A $$$ prize and residency for desert nonfiction, and a grant for spec. lit. writers aged 50+

Writing Ranch Waterston Desert Writing Prize—Submission window: January 1st to April 1st, 2018 (non-fiction proposal contest, $$$ prize + residency)

What: Nonfiction proposals about deserts and their importance (that's deserts, not desserts, y'all). Submission material includes a biographical statement, project proposal, and writing sample. Writers in all career stages are invited to apply. Winner receives $2000 cash, a reading and reception at the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon, and a four-week residency at PLAYA at Summer Lake, Oregon.

Cost: Free

"Now starting its fourth year, the Prize annually honors literary nonfiction that illustrates artistic excellence, sensitivity to place, and desert literacy - with the desert as both subject and setting. Inspired by author and poet Ellen Waterston's love of the high desert of Central Oregon, a region that has been her muse for more than 30 years, the Prize recognizes the vital role deserts play worldwide in the ecosystem and human narrative."

To Submit: More information on the contest as well as rules and guidelines may be found here. If you are ready to apply, an online submission form is available here.

Speculative Literature Foundation Older Writers Grant—Submissions due by March 31st, 2018 (grant application contest)

Who: Authors aged 50+ at the time of application who are just beginning work at a professional level in the area of speculative literature (think fantasy/sci-fi and more—a definition is provided below).

What: A short autobiographical statement, a writing sample (up to 10 pages of poetry, 10 pages of drama, or 5,000 words of fiction or creative nonfiction), and a bibliography of previously-published work by the author if available (applicants do not need to have previous publications to apply). Two winners will receive $500 grants each, to be used at their discretion.

Cost: Free

"Speculative literature is a catch-all term meant to inclusively span the breadth of fantastic literature, encompassing literature ranging from hard science fiction to epic fantasy to ghost stories to horror to folk and fairy tales to slipstream to magical realism to modern myth-making — and more. Any piece of literature containing a fabulist or speculative element would fall under our aegis, and would potentially be work that we would be interested in supporting."

To Submit: Contest details may be found here. Submissions should be emailed to olderwriters@speclit.org.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Mumps, black women in WWII, and Michael Bourret wants you to question EVERYTHING

Sharon Pelletier, Agent at Dystel, Goderich, & Bourret
Sharon wants to see this CNN headline in book form: "More than 25,000 people who were at a national cheerleading competition in Texas are being warned to check for symptoms of mumps." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Mostly Upmarket/Bookclub

               Nonfiction: Narrative Nonfiction; Society/Pop Culture; Women's Issues; Religion

"While her interests are broad, Sharon is especially seeking upmarket fiction, including unexpected suspense fiction; smart, complex women’s fiction; and hearty, unforgettable book club fiction. On the nonfiction side Sharon is eager for compelling, fierce narrative nonfiction by journalists and experts, and emerging voices with a growing platform who can speak to pop culture, feminism, sports, social justice, and/or religion."

How to submit: Sharon is accepting submissions via email at spelletier@dystel.com Click here for more information on the agency's submission policies.

You can follow her on Twitter @sharongracepjs.

Natascha Morris, Agent at BookEnds Literary Agency
Natascha retweets @KiraJW with #MSWL: "Dear Hollywood: If you insist on making 13 movies about World War II every year, you need to make a movie about black women's role in the war. Thanks." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture Books (including illustrators); Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction across genres

Nonfiction:  None

"Stories about first generation immigrants are especially welcome, since she is a first generation . . . Natascha would love to see more fantasies (a major love), more thrillers in the vein of Mindy McGinnis’s The Female of the Species and This Darkness Mine, and more historical fiction that spotlight hidden figures and time periods. For middle grade, she is looking for historical fiction, fantasy, and quirky books (as in The Mortification of Fovea Munson).  Natascha is also open to illustrators. With illustrators, she is mostly drawn to bright colors, and lush settings."

How to submit: Natascha is accepting queries via online form, here. Click here for all submission info on the agency's website.

Follow Natascha on Twitter @SoCalledYALife.

Michael Bourret, Agent at Dystel, Goderich, & Bourret
Last but not least, "for the millionth time" Michael's #MSWL request is: "Smash the patriarchy, deconstruct toxic masculinity, destroy white supremacy, question capitalism/heteronormativity/EVERYTHING." Got it? Ready, go! Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's; Middle Grades; YA; Thrillers; Women’s Fiction

Nonfiction: Memoir; Science/Technology; Politics

"My tastes are quite broad . . . Really, I just want to read something that moves me, that I connect with on an intellectual, emotional or spiritual level—anything that makes me feel the way I did reading with my mom as a child."

How to submit: Michael is accepting queries via email at mbourret@dystel.com Click here for more information on the agency's submission policies.

Follow Michael on Twitter @MichaelBourret.

Ejusdem Generis

While self-publishing and ebooks have become incredibly important for authors as ways to both reach readers and generate income, we shouldn't forget where many of us fell in love with all things written: the independent bookstore. Over at LitHub this week you can find an interview with a Harvard organizational ethnographer who has been studying independent bookstores. His fascination with them began when he read that the membership in the American Booksellers Association actually increased beginning in 2009, in spite of all the talk about the death of print. Check it out here, especially if there is or was a special store in your life (shout-out to A Novel Idea!).


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: March 5th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

A fire truck just pulled up in front of our house. Hopefully it isn't because this post is straight FIRE. Or maybe SMOKIN' HOT. I don't know. Which works better? I like the former for its contemporary feel, but the latter doesn't repeat fire. Either way, nothing seems to be burning, so that's good. This week we highlight a bucketful of new agents (well, two, but we point to more), some great places to which you might submit, a desire for some Miyazaki-like fiction, and ebooks and Indiana at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Today, we're spotlighting two of Aevitas's many new agents!

Nick Chiles has joined Aevitas Creative Management as an agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: 

Nonfiction: 

"Based in Atlanta, Chiles is deeply interested in nonfiction and fiction stories of individuals taking on entrenched institutions, writing that fearlessly pushes us to look at each other in fresh ways, voices that shine a light on the darkest corners of our society. He is on the lookout for original takes on American heroes—or crowning new ones—in areas like sports, music and the arts." 

Nick is accepting submissions via online form on the agency's website. Click here to view his profile, then click "Contact Nick" at the bottom to open his submission form.

Erica Bauman has joined Aevitas Creative Management as an associate agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture Books; Middle Grades; Young Adult; Women's; Sci-Fi/Fantasy; Action and Adventure; Mystery; Horror; Comics/Graphic Novels

Nonfiction: Select Narrative Nonfiction

"She is most interested in novels that straddle the line between literary and commercial, imaginative tales with a speculative twist, fearless storytellers that tackle big ideas and contemporary issues, and working with and supporting marginalized authors and stories that represent the wide range of humanity."

Erica is accepting submissions via online form on the agency's website. Click here to view her profile, then click "Contact Erica" at the bottom to open her submission form.

Aevitas appears to have hired a whole slew of new agents recently, so visit their agents page at http://aevitascreative.com/agents/ for more. 

Submission Deadlines

An opportunity for YA Sci-Fi/Fantasy writers to dust off their query letters, and a fellowship for US Immigrant or Indigenous Montana writers

Operation Awesome Pass or Pages YA SFF Contest—Submission window: March 12th-14th, 2018 (query contest, agent evaluation)

What: Query letter and first 250 words of an original YA Science-Fiction or Fantasy novel. Five randomly selected entries will be evaluated by an agent, with feedback given about why they're passing, or why they're requesting pages.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest rules and guidelines may be found here and here. Once the submission window is open, a form for entries can be found here.

2018 Eliza So Finish-Your-Novel Fellowship —Submissions due by March 25th, 2018 (Immigrant or Indigenous Montana writer's contest, room and board + stipends for travel and food)

Who: US immigrants (documented or undocumented) OR Indigenous writers with significant ties to Montana (from Montana, live in Montana currently, or have another significant affiliation with Montana).

What: A novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum). One awarded fellowship in each category will include a month of room and board between September and December at The Writer's Block in Las Vegas, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest details and an online submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Diversity in witch stories and queer women writing about queer women

Quressa Robinson, Bi-lingual Agent at Nelson Literary Agency (English, Parseltongue)
Quressa is on the hunt for a "MG witch story ala Kiki's Delivery Service, black girl main with intergenerational elements."  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: YA; Adult

               Nonfiction: Select nonfiction

" I have very eclectic tastes and represent a wide range of genres. I am most drawn to literary voices in commercial packages, wonderfully realized characters, untold stories from underrepresented communities, immersive world building, and complex narrative approaches/plots. Also, I am most drawn to character-driven stories and love strong voice as well. I am a huge romantic and don’t mind romance subplots outside of the romance genre." 

How to submit: Quressa is accepting submissions via email at queryquressa@nelsonagency.com. Click here for more info.

You can follow her on Twitter @qnrisawesome.

Caitlin McDonald, Agent at Donald Maass Literary Agency
Caitlin tweets: "I hope this was clear in my earlier thread but hey I REALLY want to see more stories about queer women by queer women!" Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Adult, YA, and MG Science Fiction/Fantasy

Nonfiction:  All types, with specific interest in women's issues, fandom culture, food, fashion, travel, and "absolutely anything geeky."

"I represent adult and YA fiction, particularly fantasy, science-fiction, horror, and related subgenres, both commercial and literary...I especially love diverse fantasy worlds, tropes and genre-bending, LGBTQ characters, heists, and complex, well-written female leads.  I also like contemporary realistic fiction about geeky characters." 

"For nonfiction, I am interested in women’s and LGBTQ issues, anthropology and psychology, popular science, food and cooking, travel, fashion, art, and of course fandom, geek, and pop culture.  I will look at all types of nonfiction: narrative, prescriptive, gift book, memoir, etc." 

How to submit: To query Caitlin, email her at query.cmcdonald@maassagency.com. Click here for more information on what she's looking for and her submission guidelines. NOTE: Caitlin will be closed to unsolicited queries between April 1st and July 1st, 2018.

Follow Caitlin on Twitter @literallycait.

Ejusdem Generis

A headline in the Guardian this week quoted Arnaud Nourry, the head of Hachette Livre, as saying “The ebook is a stupid product” in an interview with an Indian news site. A minor firestorm of social media and internet frothing followed, with people both agreeing and disagreeing with his sentiment wholeheartedly. Many commenters missed or ignored the fact that he largely blamed his own industry for this, and that he what he meant was that the product is not living up to what he sees as its potential, remaining instead simply a book that isn’t paper. Some claimed that it in fact performs important tasks that paper books can’t, while yet others made clear that they aren’t interested in any extra bells and whistles (the latter likely a reaction to Nourry’s statement that HL has purchased three video game companies to help the publisher realize the potential of digital media, including ebooks). Whatever your perspective, ebooks are here to stay (at least until the zombie apocalypse), and it is up to us as readers to determine the direction they go in—what we buy is what they’ll produce more of (and as authors, what we offer is what they can work with). Personally, I crave the sensory experience reading a traditional book brings, the feel of the paper, the smell, blah, blah, blah. Others have written about it better than I (and many more just as cliché-ridden, but seemingly unaware of it). At the same time, an ebook that allows the types of annotation (and sharing) one can imagine are possible when a book is tethered to the internet is something that I would be very interested in, indeed. Check out the Guardian here, an academic discussing the issue in light of her own research here, and the original interview here.

Finally, if you’re in northern Indiana next week, give a shout-out to our own Kayla Kauffman by visiting her alma mater for a free lecture by science fiction writer and founder of Rosarium Publishing Bill Campbell, entitled “Social Justice and Publishing.” Campbell started Rosarium four years ago to help increase diversity in publishing, focusing particularly on speculative fiction and comics. Swing by Goshen College around 7:30 p.m. on the 13th, if you’re interested (it’s free). Get the details here, and check out the publisher’s site here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 26th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

It's a typical February here in Charlottesville: one day it's eighty degrees, the next we have freezing rain. Which leads to a very fractured existence. Do you open the windows or get the fireplace going (well, Netflix fireplace for us)? Do you read Wodehouse or War and Peace? Get going on another edition of the Roundup or just start in on the box wine? At least for the last question I had an answer. This week we have agents on the move, great contests, wishlist highlights, and some perspectives on the usefulness of critique at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two established agents in new literary homes

Carrie Pestritto has left Prospect Agency and joined Laura Dail Literary as an agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Commercial and Upmarket Women's; select Historical; Diverse YA and upper MG including select Fantasy; select Picture Books

Nonfiction: Narrative; Biography/Memoir

"As an agent, she loves the thrill of finding new authors with strong, unique voices and working closely with her clients.  Carrie always strives to help create books that will introduce readers to new worlds and is drawn in by relatable characters, meticulous world-building, and unusual, compelling premises."

You can contact Carrie at queries@ldlainc.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines and a link to Carrie's Manuscript Wish List. You can also find her on Twitter @literarycarrie.

Colleen Oefelein, formerly of Inklings Literary Agency, has joined The Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency as an associate agent.  

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture books; Middle Grades; Young Adult; Adult 

Nonfiction: Not at this time.

"I love plot-driven, commercial stories with unforgettable characters and gritty character dynamics. I adore writing that has a great cadence and natural rhythm, which like a dance, flows and stutters in a gorgeous motion that worms into my brain and reverberates there for days. I love a fresh premise (or a fresh twist on a familiar story line) coupled with a strong, genuine voice. Just plain weird is right up my alley, and dark, quirky characters make me sit forward. Clean writing with plenty of white space and story-telling full of subtle nuances that give my brain room to imagine will pique my interest. I like a strong hook. Make me laugh, gasp, sigh, smile, sit forward, hold my stomach, or read through my fingers on page one please. Cliffy chapter endings are perfect for me and I prefer characters who take a book by the balls and yank it forward. An antagonistic protagonist, an unreliably evil villain, flawed characters, and antiheroes are definitely my favorite, as is a high-adrenaline plot. I love anything unexpected, dark, edgy, weird, funny, or so wrong it’s right."

You can email Colleen at colleen@adventurewrite.com with questions, or query her using this online form. More information may be found on the agency website, here.

Submission Deadlines

A haiku contest for US undergrads with a nice cash prize (plus bonus poetry contests!) and an upcoming award for picture book authors with a May deadline, so you still have time to procrastinate!

West Chester University Poetry Center's Myong Cha Son Haiku Award—Submissions due by March 15th, 2018 (poetry contest, $$$ prize)

Who: Undergraduate students currently enrolled in a US college or university 

What: Up to two original, unpublished haiku. First prize is $1,500, runner-up receives $500.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and submission info may be found here. Also check out the University's other upcoming contests on the same page. Submissions may be a combination of poems submitted to the Iris N. Spencer Award, the Myong Cha Son Haiku Award, and the Rhina P. Espaillat Poetry Award, all with $$$ prizes!

Little, Brown Emerging Artist Award for Picture Books —Submissions due by May 15th, 2018 (fiction contest, $$$ prize + travel + consideration for publication)

Who: US residents at least 18 years of age as of January 15, 2018. Professional children’s book illustrators or authors, individuals represented by book publishing agents, or individuals whose works have been previously published by any book publisher are NOT eligible to enter, though self-published authors are.

What: Up to 1200 words of text and at least 6 pages of finished art for an original story idea, new take on a classic story, or nonfiction incorporating the award’s mission statement, reproduced below. Winner receives gift cards totaling $1,500, round-trip travel to New York City, a day at Little, Brown Young Readers' offices in New York, and an opportunity for the winning submission to be reviewed by LBYR’s editorial team for possible future publication. 

Cost: Free

"To encourage the development of high-quality children’s picture books that resonate with readers of diverse backgrounds and experiences, that in some manner draw from the rich cultural experiences of this country—whether they manifest in character, theme, setting, plot, or are derived simply from the artist’s own experience of identity. Diversity includes literal or metaphorical inclusion of characters of underrepresented ethnicity, religious background, gender identity, class, mental or physical disability, or any other nondominant populations."

To Submit: Contest guidelines and an online submission form may be found here

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Manga and Murder

Penny Moore, Agent at Empire Literary
Penny says: "One of my favorite Korean style manga series is Bride of the Water God, though the K-drama is terrible. If anyone is familiar with this series, I WANT THIS IN MANUSCRIPT FOR IN MY INBOX ASAP. THANK YOU."   Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: General; Fantasy/Science-Fiction; Middle Grade; YA

               Nonfiction: Biography; Travel; Lifestyle; Children's books; Pop Culture

"...while she’s interested in all genres, she’s specifically seeking inventive works featuring breakout voices and compelling plot lines that will make young readers feel seen and heard for the first time." 

How to submit: Penny is accepting submissions via email at Penny@empireliterary.com. Click here for more info.

You can follow her on Twitter @precociouspenny. Penny is also the founder of Literary Agents of Color, "a directory devoted to listing and supporting literary agents of color in the publishing industry." We've spotlighted this project once before, but it's worth repeating. They're doing important work, check it out!

Amy Elizabeth Bishop, Agent at Dystel, Goderich & Bourret
Amy tweets: "A lovely e-mail from @stephlystein got me thinking & so I'll share here for my #MSWL: 'Teen girls hunting down killers: mood of 2018.' (**women hunting down killers also works.)" This sounds like a great project for any Murderinos out there... just sayin'... Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Upmarket Women’s; Select Historical; Non-Western Fantasy; Diverse fiction across genres

Nonfiction: Narrative nonfiction; Feminist perspectives on contemporary issues; select Historical; Pop Science; Journalism

How to submit: Contact Amy at abishop@dystel.comClick here for more info and submission guidelines.

Follow Amy on Twitter @amylizbishop.

Ejusdem Generis

Get your reading glasses ready and your cash card handy, because next month SP Books, an English publisher, is releasing a facsimile of the original notebooks that contain Mary Shelley’s romantic horror classic Frankenstein to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the book’s publication. Besides enjoying the illusion of having a handwritten copy of such an enormously important work in your greedy little paws, you can also see the changes that were made by the author and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. In the Guardian’s piece on the facsimile’s publication, they quote both Jessica Nelson, an employee of SP Books, and Anne K. Mellor, a professor at UCLA, on the famous poet’s contribution to the novel (the handwritings of the married couple are discernible in the manuscript, so you can see where a change was suggested by Percy and where Mary made her own changes). Nelson reads Percy quite charitably, describing him as a sort of benign editorial influence on the debut novelist, while Mellor feels that his notes reveal his paternalistic perspective on his wife. You can come to your own conclusions about whether he’s Patronizing Percy or the Poet with the Heart of Gold if you have a couple of hundred dollars (or euros) to plunk down on a book that’s entirely in the public domain. Check it out here.           

What’s not up for debate is that whatever their attitude toward us, other people’s criticism can help us grow as writers. Over at LitHub, Kaethe Schwehn, graduate of two MFA programs, writes about her writing group and the slow crumbling of her belief in the so-called “solitary genius.” Schwehn describes the unconscious pretensions present in graduate programs dedicated to poetry and literary fiction and the accompanying shared illusion of the artist as an independent genius, both of which made her hesitant to join a writing group, especially one with members devoted to writing (gasp!) genre fiction. What she found when she did, of course, were people devoted to honing their craft, people who liked talking about the power of words. And she benefited from it. It’s well worth a read. Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 19th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

For everybody who was just dying to know whether or not I took my wife out to dinner for Valentine's day: I prevailed! Dinner was at home. Of course that meant flowers, and some incredibly expensive meat exquisitely prepared by yours truly, but it was here, and not out at some overwhelmed and understaffed restaurant on Angry Amateur Night. Next up is our first anniversary. I'll keep y'all informed. This week we have agency additions, a couple of great contests, sci-fi and fantasy on some wishlists, and a federal judge's Valentine to everybody who wants the internet to keep its hands off their stuff (or her misinterpretation of important precedents which could result in the further restriction of internet freedom—it all depends on your perspective).

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two new agents over at Bookends Literary this week

Naomi Davis has joined Bookends Literary Agency as an agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade, YA, and Adult Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and Romance; Select Picture Books

Nonfiction: Not at this time

"LGBTQ+ elements and diversity in all fiction are a particular plus, and Naomi will consider picture books featuring those elements. Naomi is particularly passionate about finding new fantasy and sci-fi settings with unique magical structures that surprise the reader and change the rules readers associate with those worlds."

You can contact Naomi at ndavis@bookendsliterary.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines, or here for Naomi's online query form.

Amanda Jain has also joined Bookends Literary Agency as an agent.  

Seeking:

Fiction: Adult Romance, Mystery, Women’s, and Upmarket, with a special emphasis on Historical fiction in all genres.

Nonfiction: Narrative nonfiction, especially projects exploring the literary world, art history, material culture, archaeology, food history, or social history.

"She loves projects with a strong sense of place and those that create a completely immersive world. She is particularly interested in books that add something important to the conversation, that explore stories we haven’t yet heard, and that introduce new voices to our reading experience."

Email Amanda at AJain@bookendsliterary.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines, or here for Amanda's online query form.

Submission Deadlines

A contest of note for African American poets, and an opportunity for sci-fi/fantasy leaning flash-fictionists to put their skills to the test. Cash prizes!

YSCI-FI Flash Fiction Competition—Submissions due by February 28th, 2018 (fiction contest, $$$ prize)

What: A 750-1000 word piece of flash fiction in the genres of science fiction, fantasy, or horror. Winner receives $250.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a link to the submission form may be found here

Broadside Lotus Press Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award—Submissions due by March 1st, 2018 (poetry contest, $$$ prize + publication)

Who: African American poets who have not previously had a book published by Lotus Press or Broadside Press. Winner will receive $500 in cash and publication of the manuscript by Broadside Lotus Press within the first three months of 2019, as well as free copies and discounts.

What: A book-length poetry collection (approximately 60-90 pages). 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a mailing address for submissions may be found here

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Non-Western fantasy, magical diaspora, and women in metal

Lauren Spieller, Agent Assistant at TriadaUS
Lauren wants to see a Middle Grade fantasy/adventure novel set somewhere other than the United States or Europe.  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade; YA; Select Adult

Select Nonfiction

"Whatever the age category or genre, Lauren is passionate about finding diverse and underrepresented voices. In YA, she’d love to find authentic teen voices in any and all genres. She is especially fond of fantasy, magical realism, and space operas; contemporary stories with a hook; and anything with a feminist bent. In Nonfiction, she's particularly hungry for counter culture books, cocktail books with a twist/theme, or narrative nonfiction with a unique hook." 

How to submit: Lauren is accepting submissions via email at lauren@triadaus.comClick here for submission guidelines and more info on what she's looking for.

Follow Lauren on Twitter @laurenspieller

Kurestin Armada, Associate Agent at P.S. Literary
Kurestin is looking for a fantasy novel that deals with the diaspora of a magical community. "How does the magic change/thrive?” Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Upmarket and Commercial; Magic Realism; Science Fiction; Fantasy; Historical; LGBTQ (any genre); Picture Books; Middle Grade; Young Adult; Graphic Novels; Romance

Nonfiction: Design; Cooking; Pop Psychology; Narrative; Photography; Nature; Science

How to submit: Kurestin is accepting submissions via email at query@psliterary.comClick here for submission guidelines.

Follow P.S. Literary on Twitter @PSLiterary, and Kurestin @kurestinarmada

Kira Watson, agent/foreign rights manager at Emma Sweeny Agency
Kira wants you to tell her a story of a young female musician in the 90's owning the metal scene, not just surviving it.  Source Tweet

Seeking: 

Fiction: Young Adult and Middle Grade realistic fiction, speculative fiction, magic realism, thriller/mystery, horror, fantasy, and historical fiction. 

"Stories with folklore elements, complex villains, morally enigmatic (and very flawed) protagonists, medieval literature influences, and taboo subjects are bound to catch Kira's attention."

How to submit: Kira is accepting queries via email to queries@emmasweeneyagency.comClick here to read the full submission guidelines on the company website.

Follow Kira on Twitter @KiraWatsonESA

Ejusdem Generis

On Thursday of last week, District Judge Katherine Forrest gave a late Valentine's Day gift to lovers of strong intellectual property law and a big middle finger to those whose affections lie instead with the free use and exchange of information on the internet. As you know, here at GSF we harbor a keen interest in all matters copyright related, and so the federal judge's ruling that embedding a tweet containing an image on one's webpage may be a copyright violation drew our attention. Photographer Justin Goldman and Getty Images sued a number of media sites over their use of his photograph of Boston Celtics GM Danny Ainge and Patriots QB Tom Brady. Goldman had posted the photo to Snapchat, after which INTERNET, and soon major news organizations, including the Boston Globe, had posted stories with embedded tweets that displayed the image. The photograph was newsworthy because it showed the lengths to which the Celtics appeared to be going in their wooing of superstar Kevin Durant. The judge ruled against the defendants' motion for a summary judgment against Goldman, which leaves the door open for the lawsuit to proceed. There are a number of legal and technological issues at play here, none of which will I bore you with, but the important takeaway for all of you writers with your own websites is this: you can reproduce and embed tweets that are text-only with impunity, but if you embed a tweet that has an image attached, you may be in danger of violating copyright law. Kelly Figueroa-Ray, our Director of Worldwide Copyright Operations, was way ahead of the courts on this one, forbidding the embedding of images in our Roundups from the beginning. If you're interested in more of the ins and outs of this case, check out Wired's coverage here, and the Verge's here. For those of you really into this kind of thing, you can find the court's ruling here. Bonus points to anyone who can get through the judge's description of how people embed things like it's some sort of supergenius dark web hacker move without giggling.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 12th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Well, another Valentine's Day is upon us. I'm desperately trying to convince my wife that it is the absolute worst night of the year to go out to dinner (years in the service industry teaches you a thing or two). So far, it's not working. Luckily, I have other things to distract me from the consequent anxiety that has befallen me: this week we highlight some new agency peeps, big money for a Buddhist children's book, a residency opportunity, agent wishlists, and then fail to follow through on a planned philosophical discussion at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

A new agent, a new agency (sorta), and another new agent (maybe)

Léonicka Valcius has has joined the Transatlantic Agency as Assistant Literary Agent. [update: Léonicka Valcius will reopen to submissions on April 2, 2018.]

Seeking:

Fiction: Commercial, especially Fantasy, Romance, and Historical; YA/children's

Nonfiction: General

"As the founder of #DiverseCanLit and the Chair of the Board of the Festival of Literary Diversity, serving readers and writers of colour has been the core of Léonicka’s career. She brings this same mandate to her work at Transatlantic."

Léonicka will be coagenting clients with Samantha Haywood, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Tompkins. You can find their submission guidelines here.

MacKenzie Wolf has formed from the merger of the Gillian MacKenzie Agency and Wolf Literary Services. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Varies from agent to agent

Nonfiction: Ditto (do people say that anymore?)

"Core to MacKenzie Wolf’s business is the recognition that offering our clients legal and strategic services in addition to traditional book representation is vital in the face of a changing publishing landscape. Our team is creative, nimble, and highly engaged; we don’t just sign up projects, we sign up creators, and we believe that good representation is integral to an enduring career."

You can read about their agents here. Information about submissions may be found here.

Elizabeth Rudnick is a literary agent at MacKenzie Wolf who may or may not have been recently hired there (we think so, though). 

Seeking:

Fiction: YA and Middle Grade

Nonfiction: It appears not.

"In addition to building her client list, she is focusing on packaging efforts, pairing high-concept ideas and story-lines with strong writers."

Elizabeth is accepting submissions via email at queries@mwlit.com. More information may be found on her agency's website, here.

Submission Deadlines

A Fellowship and a Big Cash Prize if you have your s*%@ together, cuz the deadline Is Wednesday

Shambhala Publications Bala Kids & The Khyentse Foundation Children's Book Prize—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 ($$$ prize, contract)

What: Children's book (ages 0-8) expressing Buddhist values, themes, and traditions, with or without illustrations. Winner will receive $5000 and a contract with Bala Kids.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines may be found here. Submissions are via email at balakids@shambhala.com.

The Vermont Studio Center VSC Fellowships—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 (Semi-Annual Writing Fellowship: Residency)

Who: All artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world.

What: Applications are judged based on portfolio or manuscript. Winners receive residencies of 2-12 weeks at the Vermont Studio Center.

Cost: $25 application fee

"Every VSC residency opportunity includes private room, private
studio space, all meals, and full access to our schedule of evening
programs and events."

To Submit: Guidelines may be found here. To begin an application, click here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Grease, bad girls, and the history of writing

Maria Vicente, Agent at P.S. Literary Agency
Maria is looking for some updated Olivia Newton and Johnny T: "Contemporary #YA that involves a modern-day version of the T-Birds or Pink Ladies." Source Tweet

Maria is seeking:

Fiction: Children's 

Non-fiction: Yup. For grown-ups, too.

"She has affinities for literary prose, diverse characters, original storytelling formats, and anything geeky."

How to submit: Maria is accepting queries via email at query@psliterary.com. Click here for submissions guidelines on the company website.
 
Follow Maria on Twitter @msmariavicente.
Melissa Edwards, Agent at Stonesong Literary Agency
Melissa is looking for lady sociopaths: "I'd love to see some "women behaving badly" fiction. Give me your Miranda Priestly, your Cersei Lannister, your Bellatrix Lestrange." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's and Adult Commercial, particularly Women's and International Thrillers

Nonfiction: Select Pop Culture 

"She enjoys children’s books that kids will self-select and return to time after time. For young adults, she is interested in seeing fun, commercial fiction in all genres, particularly romance, thriller, and fantasy."

How to submit: Melissa is accepting submissions at via email at submissions@stonesong.comClick here for full submission guidelines.

Follow Melissa on Twitter @MelissaLaurenE.

Moe Ferrara, Literary Agent at BookEnds Literary 
Moe wants to ponder some orthographies: "If anyone has a book about emoji use and the evolution/devolution of language back to cuneiform/hieroglyphs — I’d be interested in a proposal!"  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Most genres, particularly Science Fiction, Fantasy, Contemporary, and light Horror, in Middle Grade, YA, and Adult

Non-Fiction: Generally no, but it looks like she'll make an exception for emojis.

"A Pennsylvania native, she is mum of a rambunctious corgi who is a master at stealing treats. When not reading, she is an avid gamer and always awaiting the next Assassin's Creed release."

How to Submit: Moe is accepting queries via QueryManager, here. More detailed MSWL information may be found here.

Follow Moe on Twitter @inthesestones.

Ejusdem Generis

In awesome news you may have missed, this week a dairy in Maine settled a lawsuit brought against it by truck drivers who were suing for overtime pay they claimed the dairy owed. The dairy lost the suit and agreed to pay the drivers $5 million. We here at GSF have no particular affinity for either dairies or truck drivers; we have only a desire that justice, whatever that may mean, is done. What we do have an affinity for is grammar, and grammar is what this case hinged on. Maine law provides exemptions from the requirement to pay extra for overtime work, and those exemptions were presented in a list: The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of: (1) Agricultural produce; (2) Meat and fish products; and (3) Perishable foods. Those of you who pay attention to punctuation will note that it is unclear whether the Maine legislators meant that packing for shipment or packing for distribution of the three categories is exempt or that packing is exempt and distribution is exempt. The legislators’ apparent disdain for the serial comma allowed the drivers to come to the reasonable conclusion that distribution (which is to say driving a truck) is not exempt—packing for distribution is. The circuit court judge agreed with them, and I like to think that quite a few truckers in Maine are raising their glasses to the memory of Roger Casement, who was not so lucky. Check it out here.

I had planned to segue into the ways in which the seemingly abstract and trivial can have serious consequences or exemplars in real life (like the lack of a comma costing a company $5 million) using the capture of an escaped convict in Las Vegas as the real-life exemplar of one of Edmund Gettier’s famous (and oft-maligned) counterexamples to the conception of knowledge as justified true belief. I was unable to find a record of this escape and capture to link to, however, and the necessity of explaining the epistemological arguments involved seemed too taxing (I have a feeling the reader would have felt the same way). But epistemology finds its expression in unexpected places (as my planned excursus would have demonstrated), and over at LitHub this week Emily Temple has collected various authors’ responses to the maxim Write what you know. Unsurprisingly, the discussions often hinge on what is meant by know. My favorite bit is Nathan Englander recounting his suburban childhood and concluding that what he should do is “write a book called Little House on the Prairie is on at 5 o’clock.” Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 5, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Well, the year is off to a cold, rainy, busy start here at GSF. While we're sick of the atmospheric aspects, we're grateful for the briskness of business. This week we highlight some agent news, cool contests (romance, anyone?), agent wishlists, and then consider the revolutionary potential of self-publishing at the end (well, not really, but kind of, a teensy bit).

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Irene Goodman Agency loses one agent and gains another, and a YA enthusiast finds a new home

Whitney Ross has has joined Irene Goodman Literary Agency as a literary agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle grade, YA, and adult fiction of all genres.

Nonfiction: Design, cooking, and fashion.

"Whitney loves to read novels set in unusual time periods and locations, whether that involves a fantastical element or not. She is rarely able to resist the trickster king motif, and has a weakness for read-between-the-lines subtle romances. Yet she's constantly surprised by books not on her "wish list," and is always open to stories with compelling characters and emotionally involving plotlines."

Whitney is accepting queries via email at whitney.queries@irenegoodman.com. More information about submissions may be found here.

Rachel Ekstrom has joined Folio Literary Management as a literary agent. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Thrillers; upmarket/bookclub fiction; Middle Grade; YA

Nonfiction: Psychology/mental health; social issues; parenting; nature/animals

"I’m eagerly looking for new voices and projects, particularly commercial and upmarket adult fiction with an immediate, commercially appealing voice, in the areas of thrillers and suspense, bookclub and women’s fiction, historical, crime and the occasional exceptional work of Young Adult and Middle Grade."

Rachel is accepting queries via email at rekstrom@foliolitmanagement.com. More information about submissions may be found on her Publisher's Marketplace page, here.

Jennie Kendrick has joined Lupine Grove Creative as a literary agent. 

Seeking:

Fiction: General Fiction, especially YA and Middle Grades.

Nonfiction: History; Law; Food/Beverage; Pop culture

"You change so much as a young adult, because you're finding your own identity and launching yourself out into the world. Whether you're doing it against the backdrop of WWII, high school, or a dystopian universe, you come out the other side irrevocably changed. I think we all can point to that moment (or moments) in our lives where Shit Got Real, and as a result, how we ended up a completely different person. When an author can harness the electricity and immediacy of those moments, it speaks to all of us." Source

Jennie is accepting submissions via email at submissions@lupinegrove.com. More information may be found on her agency's website, here.

Submission Deadlines

Help Harlequin do what Harlequin does best, plus two great opportunities for emerging LGBTQ and immigrant writers

So You Think You Can Write's Harlequin Romance Blitz—Submissions due by February 14th, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. EST (Fiction contest—Editorial feedback + consideration for publication)

What:  A cover letter introducing yourself and your Romance novel (which may be a work in progress), including any previous publishing credits, plus the first chapter and a complete synopsis. Winners will receive editorial feedback by February 21st and consideration for publication. 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Complete contest guidelines and a link to the submission form may be found here.

Lambda Literary's Judith A. Markowitz Award for Emerging LGBTQ Writers—Submissions due by February 20th, 2018 ($$$ prize)

Who: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer identified authors who have written and published 1-2 books of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry and are actively engaged with LGBTQ literary communities.

What: This award is for an emergent author, not a specific work. Applicants may nominate themselves or others and will be judged on a core writing sample, supplemental materials, and evidence of contributions to the LGBTQ literary field. Two winners will be awarded a $1000 cash prize. 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing—Submissions due by February 28th, 2018 (Fiction contest, BIG $$$ prize + publication)

Who: First-generation residents of their country, which can refer either to people born in another country who relocated, or to residents of a country whose parents were born elsewhere. Candidates must not have previously published a book of fiction with a US publishing house.

What: Submissions must be a minimum of 45,000 words and can take the form of a complete novel or a book-length collection of short stories. All submissions must be in English though translations are welcome. Winner receives a $10,000 advance and publication by Restless Books. 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Train hopping, unlikable heroes, and "nerdstalgia"

Alyssa Jennette, Agent at Stonesong Literary Agency
Alyssa feels like there's an overemphasis on the creation of alternate worlds/realities/universes in YA fiction, and suggests: "Why not pull from real life and give me a book about riding the rails/hobo culture? I'm fascinated." Source Tweet

Alyssa is actively seeking:

Fiction: Graphic Novels; Picture Books; Middle Grade & Young Adult; Adult Fiction; Suspense/Mystery/Horror; Historical Fantasy 

Non-fiction: Humor; Pop Culture

"She values diversity, ensemble casts with distinct voices, and formats that are specific to the story and give it its own context."

How to submit: Alyssa is accepting queries via email at submissions@stonesong.com. Click here for submissions guidelines on the company website.
 
Follow Alyssa on Twitter @AlyssaJennette.
Lindsay Mealing, Junior Agent at Emerald City Literary Agency
Lindsay loves her some unlikable heroes. Send yours! Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Adult Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Romance; YA all genres

Nonfiction: Nope

"Above all, I’m looking for a narrative voice that resonates with me and characters I can fall for. I want diverse characters and settings that make stories feel real. I don’t always know what I’ll fall in love with, so definitely reach out and query!"

How to submit: Lindsay is accepting submissions at via email at querylindsay@emeraldcityliterary.comClick here for her full submission guidelines.

Follow Lindsay on Twitter @lindsaymealing.

Leon Hustock, Literary Agent at L. Perkins Agency 
 In a turn of events, Leon wants us to know that he is definitely not interested in seeing his own "nerd nostalgia (nerdstalgia?) projected onto fiction." If you want to know what he is interested in, we've got you covered.  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Sci-Fi; Fantasy; YA; Middle Grades

Non-Fiction: Non

"He has a particular interest in science-fiction and fantasy, especially fantasy with non-Western European inspired settings and cultures (e.g. Leigh Bardugo’s Russian-inspired fantasy).  He also loves young adult and upper middle-grade of all stripes, as well as genre mashups (e.g. fantasy westerns, noir + almost anything else, etc).  Strong characters are, of course, a must."

How to Submit: Leon is accepting queries via email at leon@lperkinsagency.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found on the agency webpage, here.

Follow Leon on Twitter @LeonHusock.

Ejusdem Generis

This week over at Buzzfeed, Jaime Green discusses the reading/writing of romance novels as a political act. This illuminating essay describes the continuing evolution of the oft-maligned genre, particularly the way in which once-taboo relationships and people—which is to say anything involving non-cis, non-white, non-straight folks—are now populating the romance landscape in ever-greater numbers. The authors Green interviews describe how simply writing the stories they want to tell is inherently political when the characters those stories are about are members of groups who are politically marginalized IRL. The whole thing is worth a read, but my favorite bit comes from Green herself, who wraps the piece up by describing the endeavor of romance as a “kind of literary whisper network” that discusses a host of highly political issues, largely free of male critique because men generally ignore the genre due to “taboo or misguided derision.” Check it out here.

As self-publishing becomes an ever-larger piece of the literary pie, it may be that evolutions like the one Green describes can happen more quickly, maybe much more. Suzanne Brockmann, an award-winning romance novelist, told Green how in 1992 she wasn’t allowed to have even one minor character be gay, and as late as 2007 had to fight to get out her book about a gay Navy SEAL. When following traditional publishing routes, an author is always subject to an array of forces whose interests do not necessarily include keeping intact her artistic vision. The self-published author is beholden to none of these, though, and so is free to include material that may not be in sync with the particular mores of the publishing guild.

Speaking of resisting the forces aligned against the author, this week the San Francisco Chronicle profiled an Oakland nonprofit press that focuses on international literature—works that are being overlooked by the big houses. Transit Books is interested in literature that deserves distribution but for one reason or another has been ignored. The founders, a married couple originally from New York, formed the press as a nonprofit so that they could make decisions in line with their mission rather than on sales potential. The works they have put out so far have been well received, and they plan to expand their portfolio to include American works that “push literary boundaries.” Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: January 29, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Hey, y'all. This week we've got our usual array of agent news, great submissions opportunities, Manuscript Wishlist highlights, and at the end a note about authors living and recently passed.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two agents join new agencies, one agent comes back on the scene

Joseph Parsons has has joined Holloway Literary as a literary agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Contemporary (post-1945) American literary fiction.

Nonfiction: Literary and creative nonfiction, travel and nature writing, current events, history, biography, long-form journalism and scholarly work written for a general audience

"Joseph is especially seeking new voices including the work of women, people of color, and others who may have been underrepresented in past years, in particular LGBTQ and immigrant authors."

Joseph is accepting queries via email at submissions@hollowayliteraryagency.com. More information about submissions may be found on his profile page, here.

Linda Camacho has joined Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency as a literary agent. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction, all genres; select graphic novels; select picture book writer-illustrators; adult fiction (namely, upmarket/book club fiction, women's fiction/romance, and literary horror)

Nonfiction: nope.

In a recent #MSWL twee Linda said she would like a book project inspired by Ballerina Aesha Ash who was spotted "wandering around inner city Rochester in a tutu to change stereotypes about women of color and inspire young kids" Source Tweet

Stephanie is accepting queries via email at QueryLinda@galltzacker.com. More information about submissions may be found on her agency's website, here.

Lindsay Davis Auld has re-joined Writers House as a junior agent. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's Picture Books; Middle Grade and Young Adult General Fiction

Nonfiction: nope. nope.

"I'm actively building my own list and I'm seeking picture book, middle grade, and young adult manuscripts. I've always been passionate about children's and young adult literature, and, as an agent, I'm eager to help bring fresh voices, characters and stories to a new generation of readers. I'm particularly drawn to mysteries, fantasy, historical fiction, magical realism, adventure, and books with humor--light or dark or both."

Lindsay is accepting queries via email at lauld@writershouse.com. More information about submissions may be found on her Publishers Marketplace member page, here.

Submission Deadlines

In February: Big $$$ and a fellowship in Paris!

Chicago Tribune's 2018 Nelson Algren Literary Awards—Submissions due February 7th, at 11:59 p.m. CT (Fiction short Story—10 $$ Prizes + consideration for publication)

Who: US legal residents, 18+ years old

What: Fiction story, 8,000 words max. in English, and not previously published. Top prize of $3,500, four prizes of $1,000, and five runner-up prizes of $500, plus possible publication in the Chicago Tribune's weekly literary supplement.

Entry Fee: $0

To Submit: Complete contest guidelines are here and the submission form may be found here.

Creative Capital Awards—Submissions begin Thursday, February 1st and are due by Wednesday, February 28th (Project in 34 artistic disciplines (including Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Screenwriting, etc.)—$$$ + advisory and professional services)

Who: Artists with projects in any of the 34 disciplines Creative Capital funds, including Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Screenwriting, etc. (click here for a full list)

What: 46 projects at initial levels of $10,000 each. Including follow-up monetary support, a project may receive as much as $50,000 in direct financial support during the life cycle of the award, with the average amount closer to $35,000. This is in addition to advisory and professional services with an average value of $45,000, bringing the potential support per project up to $95,000. US citizens or permanent residents, aged 25+, with 5+ years' professional writing experience, and not be full-time students.

To Submit: Contest guidelines (and starting Feb 1 the application form) may be found here.

American Library in Paris Visiting Fellowship—Submissions due February 15th (Fellowship, $5000 stipend)

Who: The Fellowship is open to all nationalities, though the proposed project (a book project, fiction or non-fiction, or a feature-length documentary film, that contributes to cross-cultural discourse) must be in English.

What: The Visiting Fellowship offers writers and researchers an opportunity to pursue a creative project in Paris for a month or longer while participating actively in the life of the American Library.

Cost: The $5000 will be paid one month ahead of the fellowship and is to be spent at the discretion of the Fellow, is designed to cover travel to Paris, accommodation, and expenses associated with the month in Paris.

To Submit: Submission information and guidelines may be found here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: magic, imagination, and strong women

Alice Speilburg, Literary Agent and Founder of Speilburg Literary Agency [Please Note: Will opens to submission on Feb 1st]
Alice will be coming back from "a long haitus" on February 1st and hopes "to see lots of stories that sidestep into magic, mystery, horror, or adventure in my inbox next month!" See her newly updated #MSWL page here. Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Historical Fiction, Mainstream Fiction with elements of Fantasy/Mystery/Horror, Fairytale/Folklore Fantasy, Mystery/Suspense, Young Adult

Nonfiction: History, Journalism, LGBTQ, Science, Travel

How to Submit: Beginning February 1st, Alice will be accepting submissions via email at speilburgliterary@gmail.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Alice on Twitter @alicespeilburg.

Kent D. Wolf, Literary Agent at The Friedrich Agency
Kent is not looking for Young Adult book projects but wants to bring some of imagination into the Adult Fiction world. He says "...if your writing and imagination in the adult space are anything like Sara Porter () you have me at hello."  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Commercial and Literary Fiction; Young Adult (but not really in the market for this at the moment)

Nonfiction: Memoir, Narrative Nonfiction, Pop Culture

How to Submit: Kent is accepting queries via email at kwolf@friedrichagency.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Kent on Twitter @kentdwolf.

Stacy Testa, Literary Agent at Writers House
Stacy would love a book project about Caroline Still Wiley Anderson, born in 1848. Graduated from Oberlin, the only black woman in class. She later taught at Howard University and in 1878 became Philadelphia's first black doctor. She states " Oooh would love to see a historical novel or narrative biography about this badass broad." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary Fiction and Upmarket Women’s Fiction, particularly stories with international settings, unique subcultures, historical hooks, magical realism, unusual narrators, and/or strong, empowered women

Nonfiction: Memoir, Humor, Narrative Nonfiction, History, Investigative Journalism, True Crime, essay collections and prescriptive titles with strong platforms

"As a young agent with space on my list and decades of agenting ahead of me, I am looking to develop long-term partnerships with new authors."

How to Submit: Stacy is accepting queries via email at testa@writershouse.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found on her Publishers Marketplace member page, here.

Follow Stacey on Twitter @stacy_testa.

Ejusdem Generis

As all of you know, the literary world lost one of its greats last week. The work of Ursula K. Le Guin was an entry point to a more literary corpus of texts for many sci-fi fans, and a door to science fiction for many who had previously considered anything with that label to be mere genre twaddle. There have been many moving and thoughtful tributes to her over the last seven days, and I have no pretensions that this humble Ejusdem be numbered among them, so I will simply direct your attention to a lovely interview Le Guin did with the Paris Review. Most of it is behind a paywall, but there is some lovely conversation available to anybody, and hey, if you're going to pay for something on the internet, why not this? Check it out here

Our good friend Jane Friedman has a book coming out soon: The Business of Being a Writer. While in our experience everything she writes is worth checking out, the people at Publishers Weekly have decided that her newest isn't just worth reading, it's indispensable for those interested in trying to make a living writing. Check it out here.  

Just a short one this week, as we get back in the swing of things. See you next Monday!


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: January 22, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Happy New Year! Although we were off-line a bit longer than we planned, GSF is back in the full swing of things. This week we showcase two agent promotions, some great submissions opportunities, Manuscript Wishlist highlights, and a very cool directory at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two Stephanies are Promoted to Senior Agent!

Stephanie Sinclair has been promoted to Senior Agent at Transatlantic Agency.

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary fiction, upmarket women’s and commercial fiction. Will consider literary thriller and suspense, and YA crossover. No historical or romance fiction will be considered.

Nonfiction: Narrative nonfiction, memoir, investigative journalism, and true crime

Stephanie is accepting queries via email at stephanie@transatlanticagency.com. More information about submissions may be found on her profile page, here.

Stephanie Delman has been promoted to Senior Agent at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary/upmarket contemporary fiction, genre-bending suspense, and atmospheric, near-historical fiction (past 200 years)

Nonfiction: Select range of non-fiction by authors with established, engaging, and unique perspectives, as well as a few comic illustrators

“While Stephanie does not work with strict genre writers, she is drawn toward literary narratives that contain elements of surrealism, magic, or sci-fi (think STATION ELEVEN by Emily St. John Mandel or HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado). She also enjoys interwoven plots, epic/international family sagas, and fictionalized accounts of overlooked periods in history.”

Stephanie is accepting queries via email at sdelman@sjga.com. More information about submissions may be found on her profile page, here.

Submission Deadlines

Within the next two weeks: Big $$$ for a nonfiction manuscript in progress, a cool residency for a poet, and a fellowship with Sesame Street!

Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize—Submissions due January 31st, 2018 (Nonfiction—$$$ Advance + Publication)

Who: Any writer who is not yet established in the genre and resides in the United States is eligible.

What: A minimum of 100 pages (25,000 words) from the manuscript, a cover letter, and a project description. Winner receives a $12,000 advance and publication with Graywolf Press

Entry Fee: $0

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

Philip Roth Residence in Creative Writing—Submissions due February 1st, 2018 (Poetry Residency—$$$ Stipend + up to 4 months of lodging)

Who: Poets writing a first or second book!

What: Up to four months of unfettered writing time for a writer working on a first or second book. The residency provides lodging in Bucknell's "Poets' Cottage" and a stipend of $5,000.

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

The Sesame Street Writers’ Room 2018 Fellowship Program—Submissions due February 4th, 2018 (Fellowship)

Who: Fresh writing talent from underrepresented racial backgrounds. Emerging storytellers who are selected to join the Writers’ Room fellowship will receive hands-on writing experience guided by Sesame Street veterans and other media industry leaders.

What: 8 weekly sessions with industry writers, producers, agents, and executives at the Sesame Street NYC offices on creating children’s educational media content.

Cost: Travel and lodging expenses only.

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Lots of fiction for all ages, and nonfiction about awesome women for Middle Grade!

Lynnette Novak, Literary Assistant at The Seymour Agency
Lynette is asking for more submissions! Her twitter bio states that she is currently being mentored by Nicole Resciniti, president of the agency. Please send her more "Adult: fantasy, contemporary romance, thriller, & sci-fi YA: sci-fi, contemporary, thriller, & mystery." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: What she said in the tweet!

Nonfiction: Nope

How to Submit: Jennifer is accepting submissions at querylynnette@theseymouragency.com. Send query and first five pages pasted in an email.

Follow Jennifer on Twitter @Lynnette_Novak.

Ali Herring, Assistant Literary Agent at Spencerhill Associates
Ali is connecting with her Native American heritage. "As a person of Cherokee descent, I would love to see a Young Adult (maybe Middle Grade) work centered on the Trail of Tears. Any stories built from oral tradition?" Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Young Adult and Middle Grade (esp. sci-fi, fantasy and adventure), romance, southern women’s fiction, and Christian/inspirational fiction  

Nonfiction: Seems like a no!

"She’s a voracious reader of sci-fi, but not a huge fan of superheroes, vampires (except for Edward), witches, erotica or anything overtly dark."

How to Submit: Ali is accepting queries through Query Manger (click here). More information and submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Ali on Twitter @HerringAli.

Stacey Graham, Agent at Red Sofa Literary [PLEASE NOTE: CLOSED TO SUBMISSIONS UNTIL JANUARY 31, 2108]
Stacey WILL BE (after 1/31/18) seeking more Middle Grade Nonfiction projects about women with moxie. She says: "Last year, I received a ton of queries about fantastic female scientists and mathematicians. This year, I'd love to see female entrepreneurs, historical athletes, authors (Agatha Christie, Beatrix Potter bios), and politicians (Shirley Chisholm, Victoria Woodhull)." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade, Romance, Mystery 

Nonfiction: YES! Specifically: "Nonfiction that walks on the weird side — all age groups."

Special Requests:

Spiritualism: Middle Grade or adult, nonfiction or fiction

Ouija: Adult, nonfiction

Witches: Middle Grade or adult, fiction with a new twist

Old West: Middle Grade, nonfiction or fiction. Think Wild Bill, Calamity Jane, women of the Wild West, African-American cowboys.

Romance with heart…but that doesn’t take itself too seriously

Middle Grade nonfiction series on women with moxie: Agatha Christie, Beatrix Potter, Hedy Lamarr, Mary Shelley, Ida Lupino

How to Submit: Stacey will be accepting queries on February 1, 2018 via email at stacey@redsofaliterary.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found on her personal website here.

Follow Stacey on Twitter @staceyigraham.

Ejusdem Generis

While surfing(?) the Twittersphere, I happened on to Penny Moore @precociouspenny, who introduced us to a directory being compiled on The Literary Agents of Color website. "Created by literary agents of color, this directory will serve as a guide as we seek to accomplish two goals: To advocate for and protect the interests of creatives. To support and promote the careers of POC agents." Entries in the directory include an agent bio, what the agent is currently seeking, and a link to their submission guidelines. If you know someone who isn't on the list, but should be, you can contact them here. You can find their ever growing list of literary agents of color here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: December 18, 2017

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Any and all debates about climate science aside, I for one am sick of it being 50 degrees and sunny at Christmas. When I was a child, there was always snow at Christmas (and school was uphill both ways, blah blah blah, GET OFF MY LAWN!), and the spate of seasonal songs that describe the proliferation of frozen precipitate were simple descriptions of reality rather than the series of cruel jokes they seem to be now (apologies for the egregious alliteration). All the same, it's my favorite time of year, and we here at GSF are taking a break over the next two weeks to enjoy family and holiday cheer, so you won't see another Roundup until early January. This week, though, we have the usual suspects, plus a radio play about writing at the end. Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, see you in the New Year!

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Just one this week, but she's a good one ("actively working" is always a good sign)...

Jordan Hamessley has joined New Leaf Literary & Media as a Literary Agent after a decade working as an editor and is actively working to build her client list. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture Books; Middle Grade; YA; select adult Horror and Science Fiction 

Nonfiction: STEM-related Picture Books

“She is always looking to find stories that bring the queer experience to the children’s space across all age ranges."

Jordan is accepting queries via email at query@newleafliterary.com. More information about submissions may be found here.

Submission Deadlines

This Week: Short Fiction and Writing About Writing (So meta! Much wow!)

Boulevard Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers—Submissions due December 31st, 2017 (Short Fiction Contest—$$$ Award, Consideration for Publication)

Who: Writers who have never published a book of fiction, poetry, or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press

What: Work of short fiction up to 8,000 words. Winner receives $1,500 and publication in Boulevard. 

Entry Fee: $16

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

The Writer Your Writing Life Contest—Submissions due January 1st, 2018 (Essay Contest—$$$ Award, Publication)

What: A personal essay no longer than 2,000 words about the life of a writer. Winner receives $1,000 and publication in The Writer. 

“Any topic is fair game, so long as it pertains to some aspect of writing.”

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

Mysterious Space Phenomena! Government Secrets! Philosophies of Manual Labor!

Jennifer March Soloway, Associate Agent at Andrea Brown Literary Agency
Jennifer has an idea for a book she'd like to see and it sounds fascinating: "Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program--aka 'Space phenomena'." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's Picture Books; Middle Grade; YA; select Literary and Commercial Adult Fiction

Nonfiction: Meh.

Regardless of genre, she is actively seeking fresh new voices and perspectives underrepresented in literature . . . She is open to any good story that is well written with a strong, authentic voice. Surprise her!"

How to Submit: Jennifer is accepting submissions at soloway@andreabrownlit.com. Submission guidelines may be found here

Follow Jennifer on Twitter @marchsoloway.

Curtis Russell, President and Principal Agent at P.S. Literary 
Curtis wants to sink his teeth into a good non-fiction book on the value of work--something in the vein of Matthew Crawford's Shop Class at Soulcraft. Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary; Commercial; Mystery; Thriller; Suspense; Romance; Young Adult; Middle Grade; Picture Books 

Nonfiction: Business; History; Politics; Current Affairs; Memoir; Health; Wellness; Sports; Humor; Pop Culture, Science, and Psychology 

How to Submit: Curtis is accepting queries at query@psliterary.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found here

Follow Curtis on Twitter @CurtisPSLA.

Ejusdem Generis

The number of Christmas movies and television shows that suddenly appears on Netflix and in the cable listings toward the end of November is truly mind boggling. Of course, for the majority of the twentieth century this flourishing of holiday narratives would have taken place in the medium of the printed word: magazines, newspapers, even novellas. This holiday, take a break from lamenting the slow demise of print media, our collective loss of "an elegant weapon, for a more civilized age," and listen to another disappearing medium. Twenty-two years ago, This American Life (at the time known as Your Radio Playhouse) produced a Christmas special in which the not-yet-totally-famous David Sedaris and friends wrote and performed a radio play about a group of writers taking a writing class aimed at creating and selling Christmas stories. It's hilarious and all too familiar. Check it out here, and have a wonderful holiday.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: December 11, 2017

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

We had snow here in Charlottesville! Whether it is due to climate change, mere local weather patterns, or a sinister plot to make me unhappy, there is never snow before Christmas, and even the dusting we got is giving me a warm feeling in spite of it chilling my toes. In this week's Roundup, we'll warm your heart with another big-money contest, this one open to everybody, our usual agent info, and some pub industry musings at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

A promotion and a new hire this week!

Adria Goetz has been promoted to Literary Manager at Martin Literary Management. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Christian topics in all age groups

Nonfiction: Christian nonfiction including Memoir; Lifestyle

In fiction, she seeks work "featuring diverse characters, nontraditional family structures, and character-driven narratives."

In nonfiction, she is looking for "lifestyle books that feature accessible recipes, craft tutorials, gardening basics, with quirky lists or other interactive elements."

Adria is accepting queries via email at Adria@MartinLiteraryManagement.com. More information about submissions may be found here.

Eva Scalzo has joined Speilburg Literary Agency as a Literary Agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Romance; YA

Nonfiction: Not interested

"Multicultural romance [is] something I want to see more of. I support the #OwnVoices campaign to increase the diversity in Romance not just of the characters but also of its authors. As a Latina I love seeing my culture represented in the books I read, I want others to feel that way too."

Eva is accepting queries via email at speilburgliterary@gmail.com. For submission guidelines, click here.

Submission Deadlines

Do you have a short story about a sympathetic villain? A friendship forged over a good meal? A friendship with a sympathetic villain forged over a good meal? If so...

Fairytalez Best Villain Fairy Tale Competition—Submissions due January 3rd, 2018 (Short Story Contest—Gift Card, Promotion)

What: Up to three original or adapted fairy- or folk-tales, 300-5000 words each. Winner receives a $200 Amazon gift card, digital badges for use on a blog or website, and promotion across Fairytalez's social networks.

"Fairytalez wants to hear the other side of the story, the villains behind a so-called “happily ever after”! After all, as they say, even the villain is the hero in their own story."

To Submit: More information and contest guidelines may be found here.

Mogford Prize for Food and Drink Writing—Submissions due January 3rd, 2018 (Short Story Contest—Big £££ Prize)

Who: Writers of any nationality over the age of 18

What: New works of short fiction up to 2,500 words, with food or drink at the heart of the story. £10 entry fee. Winner will receive £10,000. 

“The short story (no poems) could, for instance, be about crime or intrigue; about a chance meeting over a drink; a life-changing conversation over dinner; or perhaps the details of a relationship explored through food or drink."

To Submit: To pay the entry fee and submit your work, click here. More information on contest terms and conditions here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: boys who dance & fireside reads!

Rena Bunder Rossner, Literary and Foreign Rights Agent at The Deborah Harris Literary Agency
Rena wants a work of MG or YA fiction with boys who dance: “I just went to my daughter's dance performance. There was a hip hop group of like 20 girls on stage and ONE boy, and he was killing it. I want this in a novel." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary; Historical; Thrillers; Upmarket Women's; Science Fiction; Fantasy; Young Adult; Middle Grade; Picture Books 

Nonfiction: Science Writing; Literary Non-fiction

“I'm a poet, and I think the best novelists were poets first, so novels in verse, novels with poetic language and writing, are totally things I am always looking for."

"I am always looking for Israeli and Middle Eastern Science Fiction and Fantasy, and also SciFi/Fantasy with Jewish content and themes. I would love to find a New Adult or Adult novel written about the Israeli army (LGBQT also!)I would love to represent historical fiction set in Ancient Israel, or historical fiction with Israeli/Jewish content and themes... I love all types of historical fiction, in all genres. I'd love to see literary novels set in the Middle East - historical fiction, fantasy, and especially multicultural romances."

How to Submit: Rena is accepting submissions at  rena@thedeborahharrisagency.com. Query info and submission guidelines here.

Follow Rena on Twitter @renarossner.

Dawn Dowdle, Agent at the Blue Ridge Literary Agency
Dawn is looking for some good fireside reading... "Amish Romance!" for example. "Also Cozy Mysteries!" Source Tweet 

Seeking:

Fiction: Romance; Mystery 

Nonfiction: Non interested. 

How to Submit: Dawn is accepting submissions via online form here. Submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Dawn on Twitter @blueridgeagency.

Ejusdem Generis

Last week we wrote about how important it is for self-publishing authors to be working with reputable businesses. Sometimes writing can feel like an exercise in lighting money and time on fire and then choking on the ashes as they blow into your glass of box wine (I know it should be boxed wine, but I prefer the noun for its potential to be read as an appositive to the clearly adjectival participle), and being ripped off by an unscrupulous or incompetent press just adds injury to insult. But even a contract with a lauded publisher may not be protection enough. This week, the Guardian reported that the day after award-winning Scottish publisher Freight began liquidation a recently-departed former director/partner launched the first book with his new imprint. Freight authors who are reportedly still owed royalties and are faced with having the remainder of their books pulped if they can’t buy the back stock (shout out again to Manutius Press and Umberto Eco!) are understandably less than pleased. The idea that writing is about taking risks is a cliché (as well as totalizing and therefore untrue), but the reality is that it is always risky, just for reasons that have little to do with content, voice, or form. Check it out here.

While you’re over at the Guardian, check out their piece on the lack of diversity in British publishing and the efforts that are being made to remedy this problem. While the attempts may be being made with the best of intentions, some British authors remain skeptical. One author and professor spoke of a “black brain drain” to the United States, where opportunities are perceived to be more numerous. So those of us on this side of the Atlantic can be happy that for once we’re at least thought to be less white-male-centric than somewhere else.

Speaking of diversity in literature, take a few minutes out of your day to read Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nobel acceptance speech from last week. Ishiguro describes various snippets of his life that helped develop and define his writing, and ends with the argument that only by embracing more diversity in literature, both human and formal, will we be able to experience the best that writing has to offer. Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.