Get Published Weekly Roundup: April 30, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Hello, Writers and Friends of GSF! I'm taking the reins this week, but don't worry, Christopher, the usual compiler of the Roundup, will be back next week. This week we've got two newish agents, two chances for publication of that finished manuscript, #MSWL entries from a couple of hungry agents, and a reflection on #TenQueries at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Newish Agents: One wants fiction, the other non

Jaidree Braddix is an associate agent at Sterling Lord Literistic.

Seeking:

Fiction: Nope

Nonfiction: Current Affairs/Politics; Food/Lifestyle; General Non-Fiction; Health/Fitness

"Jaidree is interested in both serious non-fiction and buzz-worthy topics that can make a big media splash. Formerly a publicist at an independent press, Jaidree is always on the lookout for projects with a “newsy” hook."

Jaidree is accepting submissions via online form, here. She is also accepting queries via post. Find all submission information here.

Madison Smartt Bell is an agent at Ayesha Pande Literary.

Seeking:

Fiction: Crime/Police; General Fiction; Literary Fiction

Nonfiction: Nah

"He is interested in literary fiction, noir, criminal procedurals, work from the Caribbean basin and other diasporas, and anything genuinely original and fresh." 

Madison is accepting submissions via online form, here.

Submission Deadlines

#OwnVoices & Southern voices: two publication contests

Sourcebooks 2018 Spring Diversity Pitchfest—Open from May 8th at 9 a.m. EDT until May 10th 11:59 p.m. EDT (Pitch contest, publication)

What: A pitchfest for completed, polished #OwnVoices manuscripts. Post a three-line pitch as a comment on the SaavyAuthors.com blog for a chance at publication.

Cost: Free

Submittion: Submission window opens May 8th. For more information, click here. For pitch contest rules, click here.

Southern Fried Karma's 2018 Novel Contest—Submissions due by May 31st, 2018 ($1500 advance + book publishing contract)

What: Book-length fiction. Winner receives a $1500 advance on a book publishing contract with SFK Press. All finalists will be eligible for contracts as well.

Cost: Free

"We focus on cultivating the artistic voices of the new millennium—with a Southern accent. The successful manuscript will go beyond stereotypical depictions and illuminate the multiplicity of the Southern experience: past, present, or future; the good, the bad, and especially the unexpected."

Southern Fried Karma is a relatively new publisher, check out this review from Woven Tale Press published in March 2017.

To Submit: Online submission form and instructions, here.

What Agents Want

They are building their lists, people!

Léonicka Valcius, Assistant Agent at Transatlantic Agency
Léonicka is "looking for books with a reliable narrator and no murder!" Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Adult, Young Adult, Middle Grade

"In Adult and Young Adult fiction, I like fun commercial fiction, romance that ranges from sweet to steamy, otherworldly fantasy, and sweeping historical fiction. I do not represent mysteries or thrillers. For Middle Grade and younger, I love humour, adventure, and make believe. I also enjoy stories about children navigating their changing relationships with family and friends. I strongly prefer books with at least 1 human character."

Nonfiction: Narrative; Self-help/Lifestyle; Self-help/Business

How to submit: Léonicka is accepting queries email at leonicka@transatlanticagency.com. See guidelines here, and follow her on Twitter @leonicka.

Peter Knapp, Agent at Park Literary & Media
Peter is a consistent contributor to #tenqueries (more on this below); from the Friday before last he had these takeaways: "1) I'm getting a lot of YA fantasy, but I still like it. 2) though these particular thrillers weren't right for me, I'm interested in character driven adult and YA suspense/thrillers and would be eager to find a big, irresistible one. " Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: General fiction; Suspense/thriller; Juvenile fiction; Young Adult; Middle Grade

Nonfiction: Zero

"He is seeking middle grade, young adult, and adult fiction with fast-paced plots and complex characters. Find him re-watching Studio Ghibli movies, playing board games with his friends, or right here to submit a middle grade, young adult or adult fiction query—he’s ready to add more authors to his growing client list!"

How to submit: Peter is accepting queries via email at queries@parkliterary.com. See guidelines here, and follow him on Twitter @petejknapp.

Ejusdem Generis

When hunting around for great #MSWL content for y'all today, I came across #tenqueries, and thought I'd look into it a bit. For those of you who do not know, if you follow this hashtag on Twitter, you will have the pleasure or horror (depending on which side of the fence you are about this) of reading through reasons why agents passed on ten queries from their slush pile. From what I could find, the first #tenqueries tweet was sent out by Eric Ruben, Esq. on September 28, 2012 (if you have any earlier evidence of this, please comment below):


It seems that people either love or hate #tenqueries. In 2014, J.H. Moncrieff characterized this practice as agents publicly trashing writers: "It bothers me when a well-meaning query is publicly torn apart for everyone’s entertainment. Everyone except the author, and every other writer who is thinking, 'My god, is that MY submission they’re talking about?'" There are others, though, who find value in such public displays of critique. On a Reddit thread from three years ago, xaviira said, "I'm not really uncomfortable with the idea of agents publicly dismissing queries. There's nothing in a tweet like 'YA Fantasy, not a new premise, word count way too high for genre. Pass.' that's going to single out an individual author. Plus, since rejection is such a huge part of this industry, especially in the early days, we might as well acknowledge it. Maybe if everyone went into this industry knowing just how much rejection there is, and how subjective a pass can be, we wouldn't beat ourselves up over it so much."

How do you all feel about #tenqueries? The originator (or at least one of the earliest #tenqueries users) just recently left the industry this past week, and at least some will miss him and his posts on query passes:

 


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 12th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Well, another Valentine's Day is upon us. I'm desperately trying to convince my wife that it is the absolute worst night of the year to go out to dinner (years in the service industry teaches you a thing or two). So far, it's not working. Luckily, I have other things to distract me from the consequent anxiety that has befallen me: this week we highlight some new agency peeps, big money for a Buddhist children's book, a residency opportunity, agent wishlists, and then fail to follow through on a planned philosophical discussion at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

A new agent, a new agency (sorta), and another new agent (maybe)

Léonicka Valcius has has joined the Transatlantic Agency as Assistant Literary Agent. [update: Léonicka Valcius will reopen to submissions on April 2, 2018.]

Seeking:

Fiction: Commercial, especially Fantasy, Romance, and Historical; YA/children's

Nonfiction: General

"As the founder of #DiverseCanLit and the Chair of the Board of the Festival of Literary Diversity, serving readers and writers of colour has been the core of Léonicka’s career. She brings this same mandate to her work at Transatlantic."

Léonicka will be coagenting clients with Samantha Haywood, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Tompkins. You can find their submission guidelines here.

MacKenzie Wolf has formed from the merger of the Gillian MacKenzie Agency and Wolf Literary Services. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Varies from agent to agent

Nonfiction: Ditto (do people say that anymore?)

"Core to MacKenzie Wolf’s business is the recognition that offering our clients legal and strategic services in addition to traditional book representation is vital in the face of a changing publishing landscape. Our team is creative, nimble, and highly engaged; we don’t just sign up projects, we sign up creators, and we believe that good representation is integral to an enduring career."

You can read about their agents here. Information about submissions may be found here.

Elizabeth Rudnick is a literary agent at MacKenzie Wolf who may or may not have been recently hired there (we think so, though). 

Seeking:

Fiction: YA and Middle Grade

Nonfiction: It appears not.

"In addition to building her client list, she is focusing on packaging efforts, pairing high-concept ideas and story-lines with strong writers."

Elizabeth is accepting submissions via email at queries@mwlit.com. More information may be found on her agency's website, here.

Submission Deadlines

A Fellowship and a Big Cash Prize if you have your s*%@ together, cuz the deadline Is Wednesday

Shambhala Publications Bala Kids & The Khyentse Foundation Children's Book Prize—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 ($$$ prize, contract)

What: Children's book (ages 0-8) expressing Buddhist values, themes, and traditions, with or without illustrations. Winner will receive $5000 and a contract with Bala Kids.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines may be found here. Submissions are via email at balakids@shambhala.com.

The Vermont Studio Center VSC Fellowships—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 (Semi-Annual Writing Fellowship: Residency)

Who: All artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world.

What: Applications are judged based on portfolio or manuscript. Winners receive residencies of 2-12 weeks at the Vermont Studio Center.

Cost: $25 application fee

"Every VSC residency opportunity includes private room, private
studio space, all meals, and full access to our schedule of evening
programs and events."

To Submit: Guidelines may be found here. To begin an application, click here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Grease, bad girls, and the history of writing

Maria Vicente, Agent at P.S. Literary Agency
Maria is looking for some updated Olivia Newton and Johnny T: "Contemporary #YA that involves a modern-day version of the T-Birds or Pink Ladies." Source Tweet

Maria is seeking:

Fiction: Children's 

Non-fiction: Yup. For grown-ups, too.

"She has affinities for literary prose, diverse characters, original storytelling formats, and anything geeky."

How to submit: Maria is accepting queries via email at query@psliterary.com. Click here for submissions guidelines on the company website.
 
Follow Maria on Twitter @msmariavicente.
Melissa Edwards, Agent at Stonesong Literary Agency
Melissa is looking for lady sociopaths: "I'd love to see some "women behaving badly" fiction. Give me your Miranda Priestly, your Cersei Lannister, your Bellatrix Lestrange." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's and Adult Commercial, particularly Women's and International Thrillers

Nonfiction: Select Pop Culture 

"She enjoys children’s books that kids will self-select and return to time after time. For young adults, she is interested in seeing fun, commercial fiction in all genres, particularly romance, thriller, and fantasy."

How to submit: Melissa is accepting submissions at via email at submissions@stonesong.comClick here for full submission guidelines.

Follow Melissa on Twitter @MelissaLaurenE.

Moe Ferrara, Literary Agent at BookEnds Literary 
Moe wants to ponder some orthographies: "If anyone has a book about emoji use and the evolution/devolution of language back to cuneiform/hieroglyphs — I’d be interested in a proposal!"  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Most genres, particularly Science Fiction, Fantasy, Contemporary, and light Horror, in Middle Grade, YA, and Adult

Non-Fiction: Generally no, but it looks like she'll make an exception for emojis.

"A Pennsylvania native, she is mum of a rambunctious corgi who is a master at stealing treats. When not reading, she is an avid gamer and always awaiting the next Assassin's Creed release."

How to Submit: Moe is accepting queries via QueryManager, here. More detailed MSWL information may be found here.

Follow Moe on Twitter @inthesestones.

Ejusdem Generis

In awesome news you may have missed, this week a dairy in Maine settled a lawsuit brought against it by truck drivers who were suing for overtime pay they claimed the dairy owed. The dairy lost the suit and agreed to pay the drivers $5 million. We here at GSF have no particular affinity for either dairies or truck drivers; we have only a desire that justice, whatever that may mean, is done. What we do have an affinity for is grammar, and grammar is what this case hinged on. Maine law provides exemptions from the requirement to pay extra for overtime work, and those exemptions were presented in a list: The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of: (1) Agricultural produce; (2) Meat and fish products; and (3) Perishable foods. Those of you who pay attention to punctuation will note that it is unclear whether the Maine legislators meant that packing for shipment or packing for distribution of the three categories is exempt or that packing is exempt and distribution is exempt. The legislators’ apparent disdain for the serial comma allowed the drivers to come to the reasonable conclusion that distribution (which is to say driving a truck) is not exempt—packing for distribution is. The circuit court judge agreed with them, and I like to think that quite a few truckers in Maine are raising their glasses to the memory of Roger Casement, who was not so lucky. Check it out here.

I had planned to segue into the ways in which the seemingly abstract and trivial can have serious consequences or exemplars in real life (like the lack of a comma costing a company $5 million) using the capture of an escaped convict in Las Vegas as the real-life exemplar of one of Edmund Gettier’s famous (and oft-maligned) counterexamples to the conception of knowledge as justified true belief. I was unable to find a record of this escape and capture to link to, however, and the necessity of explaining the epistemological arguments involved seemed too taxing (I have a feeling the reader would have felt the same way). But epistemology finds its expression in unexpected places (as my planned excursus would have demonstrated), and over at LitHub this week Emily Temple has collected various authors’ responses to the maxim Write what you know. Unsurprisingly, the discussions often hinge on what is meant by know. My favorite bit is Nathan Englander recounting his suburban childhood and concluding that what he should do is “write a book called Little House on the Prairie is on at 5 o’clock.” Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: January 22, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Happy New Year! Although we were off-line a bit longer than we planned, GSF is back in the full swing of things. This week we showcase two agent promotions, some great submissions opportunities, Manuscript Wishlist highlights, and a very cool directory at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two Stephanies are Promoted to Senior Agent!

Stephanie Sinclair has been promoted to Senior Agent at Transatlantic Agency.

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary fiction, upmarket women’s and commercial fiction. Will consider literary thriller and suspense, and YA crossover. No historical or romance fiction will be considered.

Nonfiction: Narrative nonfiction, memoir, investigative journalism, and true crime

Stephanie is accepting queries via email at stephanie@transatlanticagency.com. More information about submissions may be found on her profile page, here.

Stephanie Delman has been promoted to Senior Agent at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary/upmarket contemporary fiction, genre-bending suspense, and atmospheric, near-historical fiction (past 200 years)

Nonfiction: Select range of non-fiction by authors with established, engaging, and unique perspectives, as well as a few comic illustrators

“While Stephanie does not work with strict genre writers, she is drawn toward literary narratives that contain elements of surrealism, magic, or sci-fi (think STATION ELEVEN by Emily St. John Mandel or HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado). She also enjoys interwoven plots, epic/international family sagas, and fictionalized accounts of overlooked periods in history.”

Stephanie is accepting queries via email at sdelman@sjga.com. More information about submissions may be found on her profile page, here.

Submission Deadlines

Within the next two weeks: Big $$$ for a nonfiction manuscript in progress, a cool residency for a poet, and a fellowship with Sesame Street!

Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize—Submissions due January 31st, 2018 (Nonfiction—$$$ Advance + Publication)

Who: Any writer who is not yet established in the genre and resides in the United States is eligible.

What: A minimum of 100 pages (25,000 words) from the manuscript, a cover letter, and a project description. Winner receives a $12,000 advance and publication with Graywolf Press

Entry Fee: $0

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

Philip Roth Residence in Creative Writing—Submissions due February 1st, 2018 (Poetry Residency—$$$ Stipend + up to 4 months of lodging)

Who: Poets writing a first or second book!

What: Up to four months of unfettered writing time for a writer working on a first or second book. The residency provides lodging in Bucknell's "Poets' Cottage" and a stipend of $5,000.

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

The Sesame Street Writers’ Room 2018 Fellowship Program—Submissions due February 4th, 2018 (Fellowship)

Who: Fresh writing talent from underrepresented racial backgrounds. Emerging storytellers who are selected to join the Writers’ Room fellowship will receive hands-on writing experience guided by Sesame Street veterans and other media industry leaders.

What: 8 weekly sessions with industry writers, producers, agents, and executives at the Sesame Street NYC offices on creating children’s educational media content.

Cost: Travel and lodging expenses only.

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Lots of fiction for all ages, and nonfiction about awesome women for Middle Grade!

Lynnette Novak, Literary Assistant at The Seymour Agency
Lynette is asking for more submissions! Her twitter bio states that she is currently being mentored by Nicole Resciniti, president of the agency. Please send her more "Adult: fantasy, contemporary romance, thriller, & sci-fi YA: sci-fi, contemporary, thriller, & mystery." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: What she said in the tweet!

Nonfiction: Nope

How to Submit: Jennifer is accepting submissions at querylynnette@theseymouragency.com. Send query and first five pages pasted in an email.

Follow Jennifer on Twitter @Lynnette_Novak.

Ali Herring, Assistant Literary Agent at Spencerhill Associates
Ali is connecting with her Native American heritage. "As a person of Cherokee descent, I would love to see a Young Adult (maybe Middle Grade) work centered on the Trail of Tears. Any stories built from oral tradition?" Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Young Adult and Middle Grade (esp. sci-fi, fantasy and adventure), romance, southern women’s fiction, and Christian/inspirational fiction  

Nonfiction: Seems like a no!

"She’s a voracious reader of sci-fi, but not a huge fan of superheroes, vampires (except for Edward), witches, erotica or anything overtly dark."

How to Submit: Ali is accepting queries through Query Manger (click here). More information and submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Ali on Twitter @HerringAli.

Stacey Graham, Agent at Red Sofa Literary [PLEASE NOTE: CLOSED TO SUBMISSIONS UNTIL JANUARY 31, 2108]
Stacey WILL BE (after 1/31/18) seeking more Middle Grade Nonfiction projects about women with moxie. She says: "Last year, I received a ton of queries about fantastic female scientists and mathematicians. This year, I'd love to see female entrepreneurs, historical athletes, authors (Agatha Christie, Beatrix Potter bios), and politicians (Shirley Chisholm, Victoria Woodhull)." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade, Romance, Mystery 

Nonfiction: YES! Specifically: "Nonfiction that walks on the weird side — all age groups."

Special Requests:

Spiritualism: Middle Grade or adult, nonfiction or fiction

Ouija: Adult, nonfiction

Witches: Middle Grade or adult, fiction with a new twist

Old West: Middle Grade, nonfiction or fiction. Think Wild Bill, Calamity Jane, women of the Wild West, African-American cowboys.

Romance with heart…but that doesn’t take itself too seriously

Middle Grade nonfiction series on women with moxie: Agatha Christie, Beatrix Potter, Hedy Lamarr, Mary Shelley, Ida Lupino

How to Submit: Stacey will be accepting queries on February 1, 2018 via email at stacey@redsofaliterary.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found on her personal website here.

Follow Stacey on Twitter @staceyigraham.

Ejusdem Generis

While surfing(?) the Twittersphere, I happened on to Penny Moore @precociouspenny, who introduced us to a directory being compiled on The Literary Agents of Color website. "Created by literary agents of color, this directory will serve as a guide as we seek to accomplish two goals: To advocate for and protect the interests of creatives. To support and promote the careers of POC agents." Entries in the directory include an agent bio, what the agent is currently seeking, and a link to their submission guidelines. If you know someone who isn't on the list, but should be, you can contact them here. You can find their ever growing list of literary agents of color here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.