Get Published Weekly Roundup: May 21st, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Our Director of Worldwide Copyright Operations, Kelly Figueroa-Ray, graduated this weekend, receiving her doctorate! So if you write to us, please address her as Dr. Director of Worldwide Copyright Operations Kelly Figueroa-Ray, PhD. Congrats, Kelly! This week we feature a rather new agency, two contests for big money, #MSWL entries, and some poetry at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

A new agent, and a new-ish one-woman agency now open to queries

Sarah Gerton has joined Curtis Brown, Ltd as an associate agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade; Young Adult

Nonfiction: Narrative

"While fantasy is her first love, she’s eager to read YA and MG fiction of all genres, gravitating toward character-driven stories with unforgettable settings. On the nonfiction side, her interests include beautifully written history, reportage, and/or memoir for a young audience."

Sarah is accepting submissions via email at sg@cbltd.com. See the submission guidelines and her bio here.

Samantha Bagood started her own agency, Samantha B. Literary, in 2017, and is now actively building her list.

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture Books; Chapter Books; Middle Grade; Young Adult

Nonfiction: Juvenile

"Samantha B. Literary is thrilled to be eagerly seeking new clients. Every submission is carefully considered, but as a one-woman agency, I am by nature highly selective. In addition to thinking about whether I can sell the project, I also ask myself questions like, 'Do I love the project? Will the author and I work strongly together? How passionate am I about his or her potential?'"

Samantha is accepting submissions via online form, here. For submission guidelines, click here.

Submission Deadlines

Big $$$ for published authors: one for a US citizen under 39 and an even bigger one for a Canadian novel or collection of short stories

Bard Fiction Prize—Submissions due June 15th, 2018 (USA; $30,000, writer-in-residence position)

Who: Published fiction writers 39 years and younger, who are U.S. citizens

What: A $30,000 cash award and an appointment as writer-in-residence at Bard College for one semester, without the expectation that he or she teach traditional courses. The recipient gives at least one public lecture and meets informally with students. To apply, candidates should write a cover letter explaining the project they plan to work on while at Bard and submit a CV, along with three copies of the published book they feel best represents their work. No manuscripts will be accepted.

Cost: Free

To Submit: For information about the Bard Fiction Prize, call 845-758-7087,  send an e-mail to bfp@bard.edu, or request information by writing to: Bard Fiction Prize, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-5000. Submission information available here.

2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize—Submissions due by June 15, 2018 (CANADA; novel/short story collection, $100,000 CAD and $10,000 CAD to each finalist)

What: First edition adult fiction publication (novel or short story collection) published between May 1, 2018 and June 30, 2018 in Canada by Canadian citizens or residents (for books published between July 1, 2018 and Sept 30, 2018 submissions must be received on or before August 15, 2018). Winner receives $100,000 CAD and each finalist receives $10,000 CAD.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Publishers should submit seven hard copies of the book via post to The Scotiabank Giller Prize, Michelle Kadarusman, 543 Logan Ave, Toronto, ON M4K 3B6 (***Please authorize couriers to leave boxes with ‘no signature required’ at front gate***). Each entry must be accompanied by the signed submission form (click here), a current author biography, a jpeg of the author and the book cover sent by e-mail (michelle@scotiabankgillerprize.ca) that can be reproduced for use in print and online. For contest rules and guidelines, click here.

What Agents Want

Agents looking for women in STEM, among other (stranger?) things

Kurestin Armada, Associate Literary Agent at P.S. Literary Agency
Kurestin is super consistant, folks! Last July she put out the same #MSWL call that we highlighed here in our Roundup. Could you all please send her more projects (fiction and non) with "young girls interested in STEM fields"? Thx!  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Upmarket and Commercial Fiction, Magic Realism, Science Fiction, Fantasy, select Historical Fiction, LGBTQ (any genre), illustrated Picture Books, Middle Grade, Young Adult, Graphic Novels, and Romance

Nonfiction: Design, Cooking, Pop Psychology, Narrative, Photography, Nature, and Science

How to submit: Kurestin is accepting queries via email at query@psliterary.comMore information and submission guidelines may be found here.

Follow Kurestin's #MSWL on Twitter via her agency's account @PSLiterary.

Tess Callero, Agent at Curtis Brown, Ltd
Tess has just updated her new #MSWL page where she informs us that she watched the entire first season of Stranger Things in one day. On her list we also find "women in STEM"! Take the hint people. Find out all the things she wants hereSource Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Young Adult; Commercial and Upmarket Women’s Fiction, Mysteries; Thrillers; and Romance

Nonfiction: Pop Culture; Business; Cookbooks; Humor, Biography; Self-Help; and Food Narrative Projects

"She has a soft spot for anything involving food, sports, or Hollywood."

How to submit: Tess is accepting queries via email at tc@cbltd.com. See guidelines here.

Follow her on Twitter .

Ejusdem Generis

Here at GSF, our raison d’être is to help authors overcome the variegated and myriad barriers to publication, which can seem insurmountable; when writing is a second, unpaid full-time job, something as time intensive as finding and researching literary agents can be overwhelming, even if it is entirely necessary.* I thought of this as I read Rabih Alameddine’s essay on who gets to write (and be read) over at Harper’s this week. Alameddine notes that only writers who are not a threat to dominant culture are allowed to write, and he suggests that the economics of publishing is used to keep out threatening work: “Today’s imperial censorship is usually masked as the publisher’s bottom line. ‘This won’t sell’ is the widest moat in the castle’s defenses.” But his wider inquiry regards the way that successful writers are, in Chinua Achebe’s words, “purveyor(s) of comforting myths.” Even the work of authors who question or challenge aspects of the ascendant culture is co-opted by that culture: Conrad’s Heart of Darkness critiques the project of colonialism, all the while reinforcing racist and colonialist ideas about Africa. As culture changes, though, so do the types of voices that are allowed to be heard; world literature is now widespread and critically lauded. Yet culture’s co-opting of those voices continues, and Alameddine does not except himself from this process. What can this tell us as writers in our own genres, categories, and identities, whatever they may be? Maybe the takeaway is that obeisance to the dictates of our culture is what’s missing from our work. Maybe my novel doesn’t have enough firefighters, pickup trucks, and sturdy-but-feminine women in jean shorts, or on the other hand, uptight intellectuals roaming the Upper East Side questioning their life’s work. Or maybe the takeaway is that writing (and reading) at its best is an act that requires an intense ability to observe and scrutinize both ourselves and our neighbors, to leave to others the assumptions we operate on in our daily lives and to resist our own first impressions and impulses, and that that is all we can do. I’ll let y’all come to your own conclusions about what I think. The whole thing is well worth a read. Check it out here.

Speaking of barriers to entry, not ever leaving your house is a big one. I thought of this as I read through LitHub’s collection of writers talking about their favorite poems. Jesse Ball talks about “Jabberwocky,” one of my favorites, and one of the first I memorized. The very first poem I memorized, however, is Emily Dickinson’s “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” When I was a child, if I was too ill to go to school, I would be forced to stay with my grandmother. Grandmother’s apartment was not a place any six-year-old would voluntarily stay for any period of time, and on top of the non-kid-friendly environment, Grandmother was apt to make you memorize poetry. And she loved Emily Dickinson.

I'm nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there's a pair of us—don't tell!
They'd banish us, you know.

How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

The magic of this poem was entirely lost on my sullen, fever-ridden, six-year-old self. By adolescence, though, I had grown to love it, and still do. I think that in a way it speaks to what Alameddine is talking about in his essay. The poet enrolls the reader in her own sense of alienation and feelings of being an outsider. It is this quality that allows the poem to speak to so many, regardless of whether they would be recognizable as an outsider to most of us. Tom Brady, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Warren Buffett may all feel that this poem speaks to them. As a corollary to that, this illustrates that way in which culture co-opts voices that may critique that culture: not to get all Intentional Fallacy on y’all, but this poem is not about famous and powerful people. Yet they may embrace it as their own. At any rate, read about more favorite poems here.

*Okay, so our RDE is to help y’all overcome like three or four of the barriers, but you know what I mean.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: March 26th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

We apologize for y'all who subscribe getting sent this twice (or some version of it sent twice): we've been having site problems, and the friendly fellow trying to fix them published a test version, which y'all probably got. So, sorry about that.

My wife turned in her dissertation last week. We have just started to recover from the process of finishing it (I was her editor). It has really freed up some time for us, which is great. But we both feel a little lost, now, and I imagine that this is a feeling common to authors of all stripes when a work is finished. So we salute you, authors of large manuscripts everywhere, published or un. Keep fighting the good fight. This week we feature two new agents and one established agent changing agencies, poetry and essay contests, and some self-examination at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two heavy hitters making moves, and a newbie on the come up

Tina Pohlman has joined Union Literary. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Yup.

Nonfiction: Also yes.

"Tina loves discovering distinctive new voices in fiction and memoir and is always on the lookout for academics in the fields of animal behavior and neuroscience who can write for a popular audience. She has often been described as a purist, and while she’s not exactly sure what people mean by that, she doesn’t particularly mind the label."

Tina is accepting submissions via email at tp@unionliterary.com. See here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines.

Stacey Kondla has been promoted to Associate Agent at the Rights Factory.

Seeking:

Fiction: YA and Middle Grade

Nonfiction: also YA and Middle Grade

"Living and breathing the book business for the past 15 years has made Stacey Kondla very happy." 

Stacey is accepting queries via online form, here

Chris Clemans, late of the Clegg Agency, has joined Janklow & Nesbit.

Seeking:

Fiction: Yup.

Nonfiction: Double yup.

"His taste in fiction tends toward the literary, and on the nonfiction side he’s interested in narrative journalism, cultural criticism, and voice-driven memoir and essays."

Chris is accepting queries via email or post. For the former, click your keyboard toward this: submissions@janklow.com, and for the latter, address this thing called an envelope to: Janklow & Nesbit Associates, 285 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. See their submissions guidelines here.

Submission Deadlines

Got a poem? Just win this contest and they'll give you a thousand dollars! Also, Minnesota!

America: The Jesuit Review Foley Poetry Contest—Submissions due by March 31st, 2018 (Annual Contest, Publication, $$$)

What: One poem, thirty lines or fewer. Winner receives $1000 and publication of the poem.

Cost: Free

To Submit: More information on the contest as well as a link to the online submission form may be found here

The New York Mills Arts Retreat and Regional Cultural Center Great American Think-Off—Submissions due by April 1st, 2018 (Annual Contest, $$$ + travel)

What: Essay of fewer than 750 words, answering the question, "Which plays a larger role in shaping one's life: success or failure?" Four winners will receive $500 and travel expenses to debate the question in New York Mills, Minnesota. 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest details and a link to an online submission form may be found here. You may also submit by post to: Think-Off, c/o Cultural Center, P.O. Box 246, New York Mills, MN 56567. Because they're easy like Sunday morning, you can also submit via email to info@think-off.org.

What Agents Want

Fantasy and Fishbone

Rena Rossner, Agent at the Deborah Harris Agency

Rena is looking for some escapism: "Wishing for some stunning epic diverse Fantasy and SciFi to appear in my inbox. Bring me retold fairy tales like we’ve never seen them, and ALL the futurisms. Anyone got any?" Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary and Upmarket Women’s; Historical; Thrillers; Science Fiction; Fantasy; Speculative; Young Adult; Middle Grade; Picture Books

"She is a writer of both fiction and poetry as well as the author of the cookbook EATING THE BIBLE, which has been translated into five languages."

How to submit: Rena is accepting queries via email at rena@thedeborahharrisagency.com. Click here for submission guidelines on the agency's website. Follow her on Twitter @renarossner.

Eric Smith, Agent at P.S. Literary 

Eric is feeling punny about the third wave: "I would love to read a YA novel set in the 90's about a teen in a ska band. I would totally pick it up pick it up pick it up- I'm sorry. But really I want to read that." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary; Sci-fi; Fantasy; Thriller; Mystery; Young Adult (particularly Sci-fi/Fantasy); New Adult

Nonfiction:  Cookbooks; Pop Culture; Humor; Essay Collections; Blog to Book Ideas

How to submit: Eric is accepting queries via email at query@psliterary.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission policies. You can follow him on Twitter @ericsmithrocks.

Ejusdem Generis

Not to be total Guardian stans and direct you there for the second week in a row (even though we are, on both accounts), but on Friday they published a nice little interview between the celebrated authors David Mitchell and David Peace. It's worth a read, particularly if you enjoy their work, but one matter they discuss was of particular interest to me. Mitchell begins the conversation with the claim that every author works in a limited number of archetypal themes, and suggests that "mental breakdown" is one of Peace's consistent themes. Peace agrees with the idea and suggests "labyrinth and thread" as Mitchell's own such theme. I have long thought about what ideas run through the oeuvres of my favorite authors (Eco: how following seemingly correct reasoning can lead to exactly the wrong conclusion), but I hadn't considered this as a sort of rule, that an author only has so many. Mitchell suggests that the number can be as few as one. How many do I have? Can I get more? The theme that I return to again and again is (re)interpretation. My academic work was almost entirely concerned with the way the interpretation of authoritative texts in antiquity generated new authoritative texts that then required interpretation themselves. I also am fascinated with the way ideas and art are interpreted and recycled in popular culture; hip hop in particular utilizes previous art in the creation of new art. Is that it for me, though? Where do I go get another archetypal theme? Is Amazon doing that yet? How about y'all? What runs through your works? Check out the interview here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 19th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

For everybody who was just dying to know whether or not I took my wife out to dinner for Valentine's day: I prevailed! Dinner was at home. Of course that meant flowers, and some incredibly expensive meat exquisitely prepared by yours truly, but it was here, and not out at some overwhelmed and understaffed restaurant on Angry Amateur Night. Next up is our first anniversary. I'll keep y'all informed. This week we have agency additions, a couple of great contests, sci-fi and fantasy on some wishlists, and a federal judge's Valentine to everybody who wants the internet to keep its hands off their stuff (or her misinterpretation of important precedents which could result in the further restriction of internet freedom—it all depends on your perspective).

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Two new agents over at Bookends Literary this week

Naomi Davis has joined Bookends Literary Agency as an agent.

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade, YA, and Adult Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and Romance; Select Picture Books

Nonfiction: Not at this time

"LGBTQ+ elements and diversity in all fiction are a particular plus, and Naomi will consider picture books featuring those elements. Naomi is particularly passionate about finding new fantasy and sci-fi settings with unique magical structures that surprise the reader and change the rules readers associate with those worlds."

You can contact Naomi at ndavis@bookendsliterary.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines, or here for Naomi's online query form.

Amanda Jain has also joined Bookends Literary Agency as an agent.  

Seeking:

Fiction: Adult Romance, Mystery, Women’s, and Upmarket, with a special emphasis on Historical fiction in all genres.

Nonfiction: Narrative nonfiction, especially projects exploring the literary world, art history, material culture, archaeology, food history, or social history.

"She loves projects with a strong sense of place and those that create a completely immersive world. She is particularly interested in books that add something important to the conversation, that explore stories we haven’t yet heard, and that introduce new voices to our reading experience."

Email Amanda at AJain@bookendsliterary.com. Click here for more information on the agency's submission guidelines, or here for Amanda's online query form.

Submission Deadlines

A contest of note for African American poets, and an opportunity for sci-fi/fantasy leaning flash-fictionists to put their skills to the test. Cash prizes!

YSCI-FI Flash Fiction Competition—Submissions due by February 28th, 2018 (fiction contest, $$$ prize)

What: A 750-1000 word piece of flash fiction in the genres of science fiction, fantasy, or horror. Winner receives $250.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a link to the submission form may be found here

Broadside Lotus Press Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award—Submissions due by March 1st, 2018 (poetry contest, $$$ prize + publication)

Who: African American poets who have not previously had a book published by Lotus Press or Broadside Press. Winner will receive $500 in cash and publication of the manuscript by Broadside Lotus Press within the first three months of 2019, as well as free copies and discounts.

What: A book-length poetry collection (approximately 60-90 pages). 

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a mailing address for submissions may be found here

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Non-Western fantasy, magical diaspora, and women in metal

Lauren Spieller, Agent Assistant at TriadaUS
Lauren wants to see a Middle Grade fantasy/adventure novel set somewhere other than the United States or Europe.  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Middle Grade; YA; Select Adult

Select Nonfiction

"Whatever the age category or genre, Lauren is passionate about finding diverse and underrepresented voices. In YA, she’d love to find authentic teen voices in any and all genres. She is especially fond of fantasy, magical realism, and space operas; contemporary stories with a hook; and anything with a feminist bent. In Nonfiction, she's particularly hungry for counter culture books, cocktail books with a twist/theme, or narrative nonfiction with a unique hook." 

How to submit: Lauren is accepting submissions via email at lauren@triadaus.comClick here for submission guidelines and more info on what she's looking for.

Follow Lauren on Twitter @laurenspieller

Kurestin Armada, Associate Agent at P.S. Literary
Kurestin is looking for a fantasy novel that deals with the diaspora of a magical community. "How does the magic change/thrive?” Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Upmarket and Commercial; Magic Realism; Science Fiction; Fantasy; Historical; LGBTQ (any genre); Picture Books; Middle Grade; Young Adult; Graphic Novels; Romance

Nonfiction: Design; Cooking; Pop Psychology; Narrative; Photography; Nature; Science

How to submit: Kurestin is accepting submissions via email at query@psliterary.comClick here for submission guidelines.

Follow P.S. Literary on Twitter @PSLiterary, and Kurestin @kurestinarmada

Kira Watson, agent/foreign rights manager at Emma Sweeny Agency
Kira wants you to tell her a story of a young female musician in the 90's owning the metal scene, not just surviving it.  Source Tweet

Seeking: 

Fiction: Young Adult and Middle Grade realistic fiction, speculative fiction, magic realism, thriller/mystery, horror, fantasy, and historical fiction. 

"Stories with folklore elements, complex villains, morally enigmatic (and very flawed) protagonists, medieval literature influences, and taboo subjects are bound to catch Kira's attention."

How to submit: Kira is accepting queries via email to queries@emmasweeneyagency.comClick here to read the full submission guidelines on the company website.

Follow Kira on Twitter @KiraWatsonESA

Ejusdem Generis

On Thursday of last week, District Judge Katherine Forrest gave a late Valentine's Day gift to lovers of strong intellectual property law and a big middle finger to those whose affections lie instead with the free use and exchange of information on the internet. As you know, here at GSF we harbor a keen interest in all matters copyright related, and so the federal judge's ruling that embedding a tweet containing an image on one's webpage may be a copyright violation drew our attention. Photographer Justin Goldman and Getty Images sued a number of media sites over their use of his photograph of Boston Celtics GM Danny Ainge and Patriots QB Tom Brady. Goldman had posted the photo to Snapchat, after which INTERNET, and soon major news organizations, including the Boston Globe, had posted stories with embedded tweets that displayed the image. The photograph was newsworthy because it showed the lengths to which the Celtics appeared to be going in their wooing of superstar Kevin Durant. The judge ruled against the defendants' motion for a summary judgment against Goldman, which leaves the door open for the lawsuit to proceed. There are a number of legal and technological issues at play here, none of which will I bore you with, but the important takeaway for all of you writers with your own websites is this: you can reproduce and embed tweets that are text-only with impunity, but if you embed a tweet that has an image attached, you may be in danger of violating copyright law. Kelly Figueroa-Ray, our Director of Worldwide Copyright Operations, was way ahead of the courts on this one, forbidding the embedding of images in our Roundups from the beginning. If you're interested in more of the ins and outs of this case, check out Wired's coverage here, and the Verge's here. For those of you really into this kind of thing, you can find the court's ruling here. Bonus points to anyone who can get through the judge's description of how people embed things like it's some sort of supergenius dark web hacker move without giggling.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: February 12th, 2018

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Well, another Valentine's Day is upon us. I'm desperately trying to convince my wife that it is the absolute worst night of the year to go out to dinner (years in the service industry teaches you a thing or two). So far, it's not working. Luckily, I have other things to distract me from the consequent anxiety that has befallen me: this week we highlight some new agency peeps, big money for a Buddhist children's book, a residency opportunity, agent wishlists, and then fail to follow through on a planned philosophical discussion at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

A new agent, a new agency (sorta), and another new agent (maybe)

Léonicka Valcius has has joined the Transatlantic Agency as Assistant Literary Agent. [update: Léonicka Valcius will reopen to submissions on April 2, 2018.]

Seeking:

Fiction: Commercial, especially Fantasy, Romance, and Historical; YA/children's

Nonfiction: General

"As the founder of #DiverseCanLit and the Chair of the Board of the Festival of Literary Diversity, serving readers and writers of colour has been the core of Léonicka’s career. She brings this same mandate to her work at Transatlantic."

Léonicka will be coagenting clients with Samantha Haywood, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Tompkins. You can find their submission guidelines here.

MacKenzie Wolf has formed from the merger of the Gillian MacKenzie Agency and Wolf Literary Services. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Varies from agent to agent

Nonfiction: Ditto (do people say that anymore?)

"Core to MacKenzie Wolf’s business is the recognition that offering our clients legal and strategic services in addition to traditional book representation is vital in the face of a changing publishing landscape. Our team is creative, nimble, and highly engaged; we don’t just sign up projects, we sign up creators, and we believe that good representation is integral to an enduring career."

You can read about their agents here. Information about submissions may be found here.

Elizabeth Rudnick is a literary agent at MacKenzie Wolf who may or may not have been recently hired there (we think so, though). 

Seeking:

Fiction: YA and Middle Grade

Nonfiction: It appears not.

"In addition to building her client list, she is focusing on packaging efforts, pairing high-concept ideas and story-lines with strong writers."

Elizabeth is accepting submissions via email at queries@mwlit.com. More information may be found on her agency's website, here.

Submission Deadlines

A Fellowship and a Big Cash Prize if you have your s*%@ together, cuz the deadline Is Wednesday

Shambhala Publications Bala Kids & The Khyentse Foundation Children's Book Prize—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 ($$$ prize, contract)

What: Children's book (ages 0-8) expressing Buddhist values, themes, and traditions, with or without illustrations. Winner will receive $5000 and a contract with Bala Kids.

Cost: Free

To Submit: Contest guidelines may be found here. Submissions are via email at balakids@shambhala.com.

The Vermont Studio Center VSC Fellowships—Submissions due by February 15th, 2018 (Semi-Annual Writing Fellowship: Residency)

Who: All artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world.

What: Applications are judged based on portfolio or manuscript. Winners receive residencies of 2-12 weeks at the Vermont Studio Center.

Cost: $25 application fee

"Every VSC residency opportunity includes private room, private
studio space, all meals, and full access to our schedule of evening
programs and events."

To Submit: Guidelines may be found here. To begin an application, click here.

What Agents Want

#MSWL Highlights: Grease, bad girls, and the history of writing

Maria Vicente, Agent at P.S. Literary Agency
Maria is looking for some updated Olivia Newton and Johnny T: "Contemporary #YA that involves a modern-day version of the T-Birds or Pink Ladies." Source Tweet

Maria is seeking:

Fiction: Children's 

Non-fiction: Yup. For grown-ups, too.

"She has affinities for literary prose, diverse characters, original storytelling formats, and anything geeky."

How to submit: Maria is accepting queries via email at query@psliterary.com. Click here for submissions guidelines on the company website.
 
Follow Maria on Twitter @msmariavicente.
Melissa Edwards, Agent at Stonesong Literary Agency
Melissa is looking for lady sociopaths: "I'd love to see some "women behaving badly" fiction. Give me your Miranda Priestly, your Cersei Lannister, your Bellatrix Lestrange." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's and Adult Commercial, particularly Women's and International Thrillers

Nonfiction: Select Pop Culture 

"She enjoys children’s books that kids will self-select and return to time after time. For young adults, she is interested in seeing fun, commercial fiction in all genres, particularly romance, thriller, and fantasy."

How to submit: Melissa is accepting submissions at via email at submissions@stonesong.comClick here for full submission guidelines.

Follow Melissa on Twitter @MelissaLaurenE.

Moe Ferrara, Literary Agent at BookEnds Literary 
Moe wants to ponder some orthographies: "If anyone has a book about emoji use and the evolution/devolution of language back to cuneiform/hieroglyphs — I’d be interested in a proposal!"  Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Most genres, particularly Science Fiction, Fantasy, Contemporary, and light Horror, in Middle Grade, YA, and Adult

Non-Fiction: Generally no, but it looks like she'll make an exception for emojis.

"A Pennsylvania native, she is mum of a rambunctious corgi who is a master at stealing treats. When not reading, she is an avid gamer and always awaiting the next Assassin's Creed release."

How to Submit: Moe is accepting queries via QueryManager, here. More detailed MSWL information may be found here.

Follow Moe on Twitter @inthesestones.

Ejusdem Generis

In awesome news you may have missed, this week a dairy in Maine settled a lawsuit brought against it by truck drivers who were suing for overtime pay they claimed the dairy owed. The dairy lost the suit and agreed to pay the drivers $5 million. We here at GSF have no particular affinity for either dairies or truck drivers; we have only a desire that justice, whatever that may mean, is done. What we do have an affinity for is grammar, and grammar is what this case hinged on. Maine law provides exemptions from the requirement to pay extra for overtime work, and those exemptions were presented in a list: The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of: (1) Agricultural produce; (2) Meat and fish products; and (3) Perishable foods. Those of you who pay attention to punctuation will note that it is unclear whether the Maine legislators meant that packing for shipment or packing for distribution of the three categories is exempt or that packing is exempt and distribution is exempt. The legislators’ apparent disdain for the serial comma allowed the drivers to come to the reasonable conclusion that distribution (which is to say driving a truck) is not exempt—packing for distribution is. The circuit court judge agreed with them, and I like to think that quite a few truckers in Maine are raising their glasses to the memory of Roger Casement, who was not so lucky. Check it out here.

I had planned to segue into the ways in which the seemingly abstract and trivial can have serious consequences or exemplars in real life (like the lack of a comma costing a company $5 million) using the capture of an escaped convict in Las Vegas as the real-life exemplar of one of Edmund Gettier’s famous (and oft-maligned) counterexamples to the conception of knowledge as justified true belief. I was unable to find a record of this escape and capture to link to, however, and the necessity of explaining the epistemological arguments involved seemed too taxing (I have a feeling the reader would have felt the same way). But epistemology finds its expression in unexpected places (as my planned excursus would have demonstrated), and over at LitHub this week Emily Temple has collected various authors’ responses to the maxim Write what you know. Unsurprisingly, the discussions often hinge on what is meant by know. My favorite bit is Nathan Englander recounting his suburban childhood and concluding that what he should do is “write a book called Little House on the Prairie is on at 5 o’clock.” Check it out here.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: December 18, 2017

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Any and all debates about climate science aside, I for one am sick of it being 50 degrees and sunny at Christmas. When I was a child, there was always snow at Christmas (and school was uphill both ways, blah blah blah, GET OFF MY LAWN!), and the spate of seasonal songs that describe the proliferation of frozen precipitate were simple descriptions of reality rather than the series of cruel jokes they seem to be now (apologies for the egregious alliteration). All the same, it's my favorite time of year, and we here at GSF are taking a break over the next two weeks to enjoy family and holiday cheer, so you won't see another Roundup until early January. This week, though, we have the usual suspects, plus a radio play about writing at the end. Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, see you in the New Year!

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agent and Agency News

Just one this week, but she's a good one ("actively working" is always a good sign)...

Jordan Hamessley has joined New Leaf Literary & Media as a Literary Agent after a decade working as an editor and is actively working to build her client list. 

Seeking:

Fiction: Picture Books; Middle Grade; YA; select adult Horror and Science Fiction 

Nonfiction: STEM-related Picture Books

“She is always looking to find stories that bring the queer experience to the children’s space across all age ranges."

Jordan is accepting queries via email at query@newleafliterary.com. More information about submissions may be found here.

Submission Deadlines

This Week: Short Fiction and Writing About Writing (So meta! Much wow!)

Boulevard Short Fiction Contest for Emerging Writers—Submissions due December 31st, 2017 (Short Fiction Contest—$$$ Award, Consideration for Publication)

Who: Writers who have never published a book of fiction, poetry, or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press

What: Work of short fiction up to 8,000 words. Winner receives $1,500 and publication in Boulevard. 

Entry Fee: $16

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

The Writer Your Writing Life Contest—Submissions due January 1st, 2018 (Essay Contest—$$$ Award, Publication)

What: A personal essay no longer than 2,000 words about the life of a writer. Winner receives $1,000 and publication in The Writer. 

“Any topic is fair game, so long as it pertains to some aspect of writing.”

To Submit: Contest guidelines and a submission form may be found here.

What Agents Want

Mysterious Space Phenomena! Government Secrets! Philosophies of Manual Labor!

Jennifer March Soloway, Associate Agent at Andrea Brown Literary Agency
Jennifer has an idea for a book she'd like to see and it sounds fascinating: "Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program--aka 'Space phenomena'." Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Children's Picture Books; Middle Grade; YA; select Literary and Commercial Adult Fiction

Nonfiction: Meh.

Regardless of genre, she is actively seeking fresh new voices and perspectives underrepresented in literature . . . She is open to any good story that is well written with a strong, authentic voice. Surprise her!"

How to Submit: Jennifer is accepting submissions at soloway@andreabrownlit.com. Submission guidelines may be found here

Follow Jennifer on Twitter @marchsoloway.

Curtis Russell, President and Principal Agent at P.S. Literary 
Curtis wants to sink his teeth into a good non-fiction book on the value of work--something in the vein of Matthew Crawford's Shop Class at Soulcraft. Source Tweet

Seeking:

Fiction: Literary; Commercial; Mystery; Thriller; Suspense; Romance; Young Adult; Middle Grade; Picture Books 

Nonfiction: Business; History; Politics; Current Affairs; Memoir; Health; Wellness; Sports; Humor; Pop Culture, Science, and Psychology 

How to Submit: Curtis is accepting queries at query@psliterary.com. More information and submission guidelines may be found here

Follow Curtis on Twitter @CurtisPSLA.

Ejusdem Generis

The number of Christmas movies and television shows that suddenly appears on Netflix and in the cable listings toward the end of November is truly mind boggling. Of course, for the majority of the twentieth century this flourishing of holiday narratives would have taken place in the medium of the printed word: magazines, newspapers, even novellas. This holiday, take a break from lamenting the slow demise of print media, our collective loss of "an elegant weapon, for a more civilized age," and listen to another disappearing medium. Twenty-two years ago, This American Life (at the time known as Your Radio Playhouse) produced a Christmas special in which the not-yet-totally-famous David Sedaris and friends wrote and performed a radio play about a group of writers taking a writing class aimed at creating and selling Christmas stories. It's hilarious and all too familiar. Check it out here, and have a wonderful holiday.


Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.  

Get Published Weekly Roundup: July 3, 2017

Book Barcode By Thepwnco [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. Change made: from color to black and white.

Welcome to our fourth Get Published Weekly Roundup! This week we highlight new agent hires and promotions, notices of approaching writing and submission deadlines, highlights from the past week's Manuscript Wishlist, and a couple of helpful articles at the end.

We'd love to hear your feedback. Please let us know what you think in the comments and if there are certain types of information you would like to see in the Roundup. Also feel free to tweet at us (@freelancingrads) with any ideas or questions. Have a great writing week!

Agents: New Hires & Promotions

Sarah Landis & Elizabeth Bewley, Agents at Sterling Lord Literistic

Sarah Landis & Elizabeth Bewley will begin at Sterling Lord Literistic as agents in July. They both will represent: 

Children's: young adult and middle-grade fiction and nonfiction

Check back on Sterling Lord Literisic's website for their bios (click here) and submission guidelines (click here). For now, you can follow Elizabeth on Twitter @ElizBewley.

Ryleigh Walsh, Agency Assistant at The Rights Factory *now accepting queries*

Ryleigh Walsh is now accepting queries at The Rights Factory. She is seeking:

Fiction: Commercial, Contemporary, Fantasy, General Fiction, Historical, Literary Fiction, Mystery, Offbeat/Quirky, Upmarket, Women's Fiction

Non-Fiction: Biography, Cultural/Social Issues, General Non-Fiction, Memoirs

To Submit: Ryleigh accepts queries via online form (click here). At the bottom of the form choose "Send To: Specific Agent" and then choose Ryleigh Walsh from the dropdown menu.

Adriana Stimola, Agent at Stimola Literary Studio

Adriana Stimola is now accepting queries as an agent at the Stimola Literary Studio. She is seeking:

Fiction: Historical, Middle Grade, Young Adult

Non-Fiction: N/A

"While i do enjoy working with all formats, age groups and genres, right now, i am most interested in author/illustrator picture books, middle grade fiction with series potential, and YA mystery/thrillers."

To Submit: Adriana accepts queries via online form (click here). Click here to read the full submissions guidelines on the company website.

Follow Adriana on Twitter @adrianastimola .

Submission Deadlines

Writers, you have until next week:

Briar Patch Magazine: Labour Issue Submissions — Submissions due TODAY Monday, July 3rd (Payment: $50-$150, Magazine Article)

What: Queries for the labour issue are due July 3rd. If your query is accepted you have until August 8th to turn in a first draft. They are looking for articles, investigative reporting, historical analysis, photo essays, timelines, personal essays, reviews, profiles, recommendations, lists, humour, comics, and art on the topic of labour (for suggested topics, click here). For more information, including payment rates, click here.

To Submit: Your query should outline what ground your contribution will cover, give an estimated word count, and indicate your relevant experience or background in writing about the issue. If you haven’t written for Briarpatch before, they are asking that you provide a brief writing sample. Send queries to pitch@briarpatchmagazine.com. Please review their submission guidelines before submitting, and be sure to check out their guide to better pitching.

Pirates & Ghosts and Agents & Spies: Two New Anthologies — Submissions due Friday, July 7th (Payment: 6 cents per word, Short Stories)

What: Short stories (~2,000-4,000 words) for the two following anthologies:

Pirates & Ghosts: Adventures and hauntings at sea, shipwrecks and buried treasure, treacherous waters, sea spirits, ghostly galleons, giant squid, kraken and a myriad of deadly sea monsters, sailors gone mad, revenge and madness, romance and the ancient skulls of desperate mariners…

Agents & Spies: From Machiavelli to James Bond, the intrigue of the Tudor court, the avarice of the Medicis, the poisons, the secret letters, the betrayal of lovers and governments, the smuggling of plans and formula for new weapons and inventions: this is the murky world of the official saboteur, plausible deniability and quiet knife in the back.

To Submit: Submit by email to 2017@flametreepublishing.com. For more information and terms click here.

"...we’re looking for around twenty to thirty short stories by contemporary writers to complement a selection of classic tales in two new anthologies. We are keen to encourage new writers, without prejudice to age, background or previous publication history. It’s the story that matters, and the quality of writing."

Operation Awesome's #PassOrPages Query Contest, July Focus: Contemporary Adult Romance Novels — Submission window Monday through Wednesday, July 10-12 (Feedback for submissions material, Random selection)

Who: Writers looking for help with their submissions material

What: Polished query letter & first 250 words of your manuscript (Contemporary Adult Romance genre only this round). "Please don't 'personalize' the query for the agents or include your bio paragraph, but other than that, treat it as you would a normal query letter. Include your manuscript's word count and title in your query. Comp titles are welcome if you were planning on using them in your regular query letter. The winning entries with agent commentary will be posted on Operation Awesome. If you aren't comfortable with having your entry (which will be anonymous) shared on the blog, please don't enter Pass or Pages!"

Entry fee: $0

To Submit: Submission via online form (check here between July 10-12). For more information and rules, click here, and here. Writers that have been chosen to receive feedback on their query letter will be announced July 24-28.

"We hope to get many types of romance entries, with main characters of different nationalities, sexual orientations, and from any underrepresented groups."

Campus Diaries Writing Competition — Submissions due Monday, July 10th (₹₹ Prize)

Who: Writers with stories about college

What: Stories set in school or college days, fiction or non-fiction, roughly 500 words. "Story trumps grammar and complicated words - for sure. But do pay some heed to the language. You can make more than 1 entry. The entries will be judged on two criteria: 1) Popularity among your peers – Get your friends to “Like” your entry (40% weightage) and 2) Judging Panel – a panel of expert judges will deliberate and decide the winner (60% weightage)." For more information, important dates, and prize amounts click here.

Entry fee: $0 (must sign in to Fourth Ambit)

To Submit: Submission via online form (click here)

"What happens when friends - both old and new - hang out together? Why is every "gupshup" session filled with stories that start with “Do you remember when..?” There is something really special about stories borne out of nostalgia. Stories that make you smile, laugh out loud, cry, perhaps even shudder at the narrow escapes. Here is a chance to showcase such stories & WIN exciting prizes!!"

What Agents Want

This Week on Manuscript Wishlist #MSWL...

P.S. Literary's #MSWL Twitter Feed
P.S. Literary tweets daily about their agents' manuscript wishlists. Click here to check out their feed.

Here are a few highlights from this week:

Curtis Russell, President & Principal Agent, wants nonfiction in the vein of Joseph McCormack's Brief: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less (Source Tweet), and "Crime fiction like Ian Rankin, Chevy Stevens, Patricia Cornwell, & Lee Child" (Source Tweet). Follow Curtis on Twitter @CurtisPSLA.
 
Kurestin Armada, Associate Agent, wants fiction and nonfiction that highlights "young girls interested in STEM fields (Source Tweet), and "Magical Realism, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Alternative History, Historical Fiction" (Source Tweet). Follow Kurestin on Twitter @kurestinarmada.
 
Maria Vicente, Associate Agent, wants "nonfiction for kids! Both YA and MG. Any topic goes—surprise me!" " Source Tweet Follow Maria on Twitter @msmariavicente.
 
How to submit: All these agents are accepting queries via email to query@psliterary.com. Click here to read the full submissions guidelines on the company website.
 
Follow P.S. Literary on Twitter @PSLiterary
The Bent Agency's Monthly TBA Wishlist
The Bent Agency's blog "Bent on Books" puts out a monthly wishlist that includes "the project that each TBA agent would love to see in their submission inbox." Click here to check out what their agents are seeking this month.
Alec Shane, Agent at Writers House
Alec Shane tweeted that he was "happy to say that I read a manuscript last night that, for the first time in a long time, legit gave me a nightmare. More horror please!" (Source Tweet).

Seeking in the following genres/categories:

Fiction: Mystery, Thrillers, Historical Fiction (The Vietnam War, the Maccabees, and The American Revolution fascinate me in particular), Adventure, Horror, Middle Grade: adventure series, ghost story, or anything else geared toward younger male readers

Nonfiction: History (odd/quirky, military), Biography (of unknown, but important people), "Guy" Reads, Humor, Narrative Nonfiction (under-the-radar events and lifestyles), Sports, Supernatural

"I haven't been scared to turn off the light in far too long and something needs to be done about it... I'm also currently up in the air as to whether or not I believe in ghosts, hauntings, and the supernatural, so if you have something that can convince me one way or the other, I'd love to see it."

How to submit: Alec is accepting queries via email to ashane@writershouse.comClick here to read the full submissions guidelines on the company website.

Follow Alec on Twitter @alecdshane.

Ejusdem Generis

  • For some insight into rejection, here a few popular posts from agents and experts in the publishing industry that delve into why some queries and manuscripts get rejected:
    • "Why Did I Get a ‘No’? – The Do’s and Don’ts of Query Letter Writing"  by Mark Gottlieb, Agent at Trident Media Group (click here)
    • "The Top Five Reasons I Stop Reading a Manuscript" by Christine Lynn Herman, Literary Agent Assistant in New York City (click here)
    • "Why Your Memoir Won't Sell" by Jane Friedman, publishing industry expert and Editor of , a newsletter for professional authors (click here)
  • On the other hand, in support of the quest to land the perfect agent, here are a couple places you can find examples of successful queries:
    • "Quite the Query" (click here
    • Posts at Writer's Digest that are tagged "successful queries" (click here)
  • Do you love fonts? Check out this totally geeky video. It rocks!

Grad Student Freelancers (GSF) is dedicated to helping authors take care of the details of the publication process. Part of the process includes sifting through huge amounts of information to find important news, events, and tips that can give you an edge in the publication process. Every week GSF will provide three lists of curated information focused on helping writers get published. Our goal is to gather what's important from the web in the past week, so you can focus more on your writing.